The GRE in Dubai Everything You Need to Know
Posted on
14
Sep 2022

The GRE in Dubai: Everything You Need to Know

If you’re thinking of pursuing an MBA, then you’ll likely need to take the GRE. The GRE is a standardized test that is used by many business schools as part of the admissions process. If you’re wondering where to take the GRE in Dubai, don’t worry – we’ve got you covered! In this blog post, we will discuss everything you need to know about taking the GRE in Dubai, including information on test centers and top MBA programs. We’ll also provide some tips for preparing for the exam, and answer some common questions. 

Who administers the GRE test?

The GRE is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). ETS is a nonprofit organization that provides educational testing and assessment services. 

Where are GRE test centers located in Dubai?

There are two GRE test centers located in Dubai: 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates — APCU-8733 / APCU-8137

AMIDEAST Dubai

Office G01, Block 2B Knowledge Village

Al Burouj Road, Al Sufouh

Dubai 0000 – United Arab Emirates

Directions To The Testing Center

 

Society of Engineers — STN14384A

Street 46, Al Wuheida Road Al Mamzar, Deira

(Beside Automobile & Touring Club or Behind Bowling Center)

Dubai 04484 – United Arab Emirates

Directions To The Testing Center

The GRE is not offered on the following holidays: 

Top MBA programs in Dubai

There are many top MBA programs located in Dubai. Some of the most popular programs include: 

Tips

Here are some tips to help you prepare for the GRE: 

  • The GRE is a challenging exam, so it’s important to give yourself enough time to prepare. We recommend starting your studies at least three months in advance. 
  • Make a study plan and stick to it. 
  • Familiarize yourself with the GRE format by taking practice tests. 
  • Hire a personal GRE tutor who will guide you through the exam. You will get one-on-one attention and they can help guide your studies according to what’s needed for success.

Test Day FAQs

Here are some answers to common questions about taking the GRE

How long is the GRE? 

The GRE is a 3-hour 45-minute computer-adaptive test (CAT) that has three sections: an Analytical Writing Assessment, a Quantitative Section, and a Verbal Section.

What is the GRE score range? 

The GRE score range is 130-170 for both the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. 

What is a good GRE score? 

A good GRE score depends on the programs you are applying to. We recommend checking with your schools of interest to see what their GRE requirements are. 

At Apex, we’re more than happy to help you get to your dream school. We offer a 30-minute free complimentary consultation call with one of our top instructors, who can design an individualized GRE prep schedule just for you.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more

LSAT or GRE: What’s the difference?

Are you applying or thinking about applying to graduate school but can’t decide which standardized entrance exam fits your desired program best?

The answer depends on what you’re planning to do after you complete your degree. If you’re not sure, it’s best to check with the schools that you are interested in attending to see which test they prefer. In the meantime, here is a breakdown of the LSAT and GRE so you can start comparing which suits your skill set and future goals best.

LSAT or GRE: What are they?

Both the GRE and LSAT are standardized tests that have a lot in common in terms of their purpose but differ when it comes to their content.

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test that law school applicants must take in order to be admitted to law school. The GRE, or Graduate Record Examination, is a general test that many graduate programs require as part of the admission process. But how do they differ?

LSAT or GRE: Format

The GRE has three multiple-choice sections, Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, Analytical Writing, and one unscored section that could be verbal or quantitative.

The LSAT exam sections are Reading Comprehension, Analytical Reasoning, and Logical Reasoning. The LSAT also contains an experimental section in addition to five multiple-choice sections (one of which is an unscored writing sample).

LSAT or GRE: Scoring system

LSAT is scored on a scale of 120-180, while the GRE uses 130-170 for their verbal and quantitative sections and 0-60 for analytical writing.

LSAT or GRE: The skills

Both exams measure skills that are important for success in graduate school, but they focus on different areas.

LSAT tests your ability to read, analyze and draw conclusions on complex texts under strict time constraints. LSAT is a logic test that will measure your logical reasoning and analytical thinking abilities.

The GRE, on the other hand, tests a wider range of skills. In addition to your ability to reason and analyze, the GRE also measures your quantitative abilities (math skills), verbal abilities, and critical thinking skills.

LSAT or GRE: Cost

LSAT costs $200 to take without the additional fees such as the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) ($195), and Law School Reports ($45). The cost of taking the LSAT can add up quickly if you decide to retake the LSAT.

GRE costs $205 with a $50 fee for each score report sent after the first four free reports.

LSAT or GRE: Which schools accept them?

You may have heard that the LSAT is the only test that law schools accept, but that’s not always the case. The GRE is also accepted by some law schools (see the list below). If you’re interested in going to law school, then the LSAT is the obvious choice. But LSAT is a test that is also accepted at some business schools, especially for JD/MBA.

Programs that accept both GRE and LSAT

University LSAT score GRE score
Harvard Law School 173 332
Yale Law School 173 332
Columbia Law School 172 329
Cornell Law School 171 324
University of Pennsylvania Penn Law 171 328

MBA programs that accept LSAT

Ross School of Business: GRE score: 320
Emory University’s Goizueta Business School: GRE score: 317

LSAT or GRE: Which graduate program do people choose?

The people who take the LSAT are more likely to go into law school while the people who take the GRE are more likely to go into other graduate programs. However, there is no one-size-fits-all answer and you should consider your skills and future goals when making your decision.

LSAT or GRE: The bottom line

Both the LSAT and the GRE can be challenging and have many similarities, but they’re not alike. Understanding the difference between these two exams can help you make an informed decision about which one to take. If you want a test that’s specifically designed for law school admissions, then go with the LSAT; if you need something more widely accepted or with year-round testing opportunities, take the GRE instead. But keep in mind that the GRE is not accepted by all law schools. Which test you choose depends on your own strengths and weaknesses. So, if you’re confident in your math skills and want to focus on your verbal abilities, the LSAT may be a better fit.

If you’re interested in taking a prep course for either exam, reach out to our tutors at ApexGRE or ApexLSAT. We offer 30-minute complimentary consultation calls where you can speak directly to a top-scoring instructor for the best and most comprehensive preparation courses. Still not sure? Read our comparison article between the GMAT and GRE.

So which is it? LSAT or GRE? Let us help you. Get in touch now.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more
Posted on
20
Jul 2022

How to Get the Most Out of Private GRE Tutoring

Working with a private tutor is one of the best ways to prepare for standardized tests. The success of this journey is heavily dependent on both the tutor and the student. They should work collaboratively the whole time and do their best to get the most out of it. Here are some GRE tutoring tips to make this happen.

1. Hire the Right Tutor

Obviously, before even starting anything, you need to hire a professional. This is the first and one of the most important steps because they will be the person you’ll work with and rely on during your GRE prep. Make sure that you conduct research appropriately and choose an experienced and qualified professional. Also, check if you can find some testimonials about them, as well as their background information. You might want to find a few options and then filter them out according to some factors that are important for you, such as price, qualifications, etc.

2. Build the Relationship with the Tutor Right

Another useful GRE tutoring tip for you is having a good relationship with your tutor. Once you’ve already hired a tutor, it is time to get the communication with them right. As you will be working closely with the whole team, it is important for you two to have mutual trust and respect towards each other. Another important step is for you to be fully transparent and honest with your background, target score, weaknesses and strengths. A professional tutor will never judge you based on how much knowledge you have, and this is something you always need to remember. You need to be understanding towards each other and also have some flexibility when working.

3. Constantly Ask for Feedback

Being open to feedback is another important thing you need during the whole preparation process. Do not be limited to how often you will usually be provided with feedback from your tutor – ask for it yourself as needed. The best way to learn and progress is to constantly be aware of your weaknesses and work on them. Moreover, although receiving positive feedback is also important and it feels very nice, you should be even more open to the negative ones. Those are the types of feedback that will indicate your weaknesses and make you concentrate on them.

4. Allocate Enough Time to Your GRE Prep

Last but not least, our last GRE tutoring tip for you is to spend as much time as needed on your materials. Make sure you talk to your tutor and form a study schedule that will reflect your busyness, and then follow it regularly. You might skip some lessons sometimes, but you need to make sure that it doesn’t happen too often. Concentrate on the preparation fully, as this is one of the most important steps towards getting the education that you want to get so much. Challenge yourself and unleash the hardworking persona that’s inside you and get the most of this journey!

Conclusion

To conclude, we discussed some GRE tutoring tips that can help you get the most out of your GRE prep. First of all, you need to choose the right tutor to work with. Secondly, you need to build a strong and honest relationship with your tutor to make the preparation process effective. Another tip is to ask for feedback frequently and learn from your mistakes. Finally, you need to work as much as needed. The feedback and practice test results will also help you understand how much time you need.

Finally, here at Apex, we are more than happy to support you on your GMAT journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you develop your personalized GMAT prep schedule!

Read more
GRE Verbal Questions
Posted on
13
May 2022

GRE Verbal Questions – Expert Tips On How To Solve Them

The Graduate Record Examinations, also known as the GRE, is a standardized exam done for the purpose to assess the test taker’s ability to think outside the box when it comes to analytical writing, mathematics, and vocabulary. The majority of GRE test takers are students looking into Business Schools and in some cases Law Schools and also students considering  Master’s ( M.A., M.S., M.Ed.), MBA’s, or Doctorate (Ph.D., Ed.D.).

Now, what is the GRE made up of? The GRE consists of three main sections: Analytical Writing Assessment, Quantitative, and Verbal. All these sections sum up to a total score of a minimum of 260 and a maximum of 340. To break it up, each section of the GRE takes up a specific percentage out of the total score. Both the Verbal and the Quantitative Reasoning scorer lay on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments. The Analytical Writing, however, lays on a 0-6 score scale, in half-point increments. 

In today’s read, our main focus will be on the GRE’s Verbal Section and questions.

The GRE Verbal Section

The GRE Verbal section consists of around 20 questions that need to be completed within 30 minutes. This leaves you with approximately between one minute to four minutes per question, depending on the question type. The order in which the question types appear is as follows:

  • Text Completion
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Sentence Equivalence

1. GRE Verbal – Text Completion Questions

For these GRE Verbal questions, you are provided with a small passage made up of one to six sentences, with one to three blank spaces to fill in. It is asked of you to fill in the blank space with the most suitable option provided to you. When it comes to the forms in which these questions can come in, there are two distinctive forms. In that passage, you might have three blank spaces to fill in, and for that, there is a list of three options to choose from per blank space. You can also come across questions that have one blank space per passage. To fill it in, you are given a list of five options. In both cases, there is only one right answer.

Here, your ability to interpret and understand the full picture is tested. You are expected to fully comprehend what you are given so that you can put the missing pieces together and still get a harmonious passage.

Example

In parts of the Arctic, the land grades into the landfast ice so _______ that you can walk off the coast and not know you are over the hidden sea.

(A) permanently
(B) imperceptibly
(C) irregularly
(D) precariously
(E) relentlessly

Correct Answer:  B

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • Before anything, take a step back and make sure that the whole passage’s idea makes sense to you. Do you feel like all the points are clear to you? Do you feel confident in completing the sentence? This is important because your answers are fully based on your understanding of the passage. If you missed the passage’s main purpose, chances are, you missed the points to its questions too. 
  • While reading, in your own words, try to predict what might come next in the passage. Try to complete the text while reading and see if the harmony is still there. When you’re done with that, move on to the next step, and try to link your predictions for the text completion with the options given. If you could not find the exact same completion, choose the option with the closest concept. Trust your gut. 

2. GRE Verbal – Reading Comprehension Questions

These types of questions come in three different forms, which are:

a. Select-in-Passage: This form of question requires your referral back to the given passage for the reason of direct extraction. That means you have to select a sentence directly from the given passage that best suits a certain description that you are asked to substitute.

b. Multiple-Choice Questions – Select One Answer: The classical and traditional multiple-choice questions you are used to with five answer options for you to choose from.

c. Multiple-Choice Questions – Select One or More Answers: This last form of Reading Comprehension questions gives you a list of three answer options, and you are asked to select all the answers that you think are correct and suitable. This means that your selected answers can be one, two, or even three.

All these questions are there to evaluate your ability to summarize, identify writers’ points of view, understand larger pieces of text, draw conclusions, and to be able to reason from given information.

Example

Questions 1 to 3 are based on this passage

Reviving the practice of using elements of popular music in classical composition, an approach that had been in hibernation in the United States during the 1960s, composer Philip Glass (born 1937) embraced the ethos of popular music in his compositions. Glass based two symphonies on music by rock musicians David Bowie and Brian Eno, but the symphonies’ sound is distinctively his. Popular elements do not appear out of place in Glass’s classical music, which from its early days has shared certain harmonies and rhythms with rock music. Yet this use of popular elements has not made Glass a composer of popular music. His music is not a version of popular music packaged to attract classical listeners; it is high art for listeners steeped in rock rather than the classics.

Select only one answer choice.

1. The passage addresses which of the following issues related to Glass’s use of popular elements in his classical compositions?

A. How it is regarded by listeners who prefer rock to the classics
B. How it has affected the commercial success of Glass’s music

C. Whether it has contributed to a revival of interest among other composers in using popular elements in their compositions
D. Whether it has had a detrimental effect on Glass’s reputation as a composer of classical music
E. Whether it has caused certain of Glass’s works to be derivative in quality

Consider each of the three choices separately and select all that apply. 

2. The passage suggests that Glass’s work displays which of the following qualities?

A. A return to the use of popular music in classical compositions
B. An attempt to elevate rock music to an artistic status more closely approximating that of classical music
C. A long-standing tendency to incorporate elements from two apparently disparate musical styles

3. Select the sentence that distinguishes two ways of integrating rock and classical music.

Correct Answers:
1. E
2. A and C

3. The correct answer is the last sentence of the passage.

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • When answering, try to derive the answer from the basis of the information given. This means that no outside knowledge is needed nor accepted.  Make sure that you try to find the answers from the provided information. You might feel like the presented views in the passage are the exact opposite of yours, and for that reason, go into the exam with an open mind and expect to encounter different points of view.
  • These types of questions revolve around different and variant topics like sciences, business, art and humanities, and/ or recent topics that can be academic or nonacademic. If by any chance you were unfamiliar with the material provided, don’t panic! All the questions asked can be answered nonetheless. Keep in mind, though, if you feel like the passage is too difficult for you, save it for last and move on to the next question.

3. GRE Verbal – Sentence Equivalence Questions

These types of questions can seem a little similar to the Sentence Equivalence questions. That being said, these two question types assess your ability to draw conclusions and test your capabilities to be able to complete passages while being given only partial information.  

Sentence Equivalence Questions include a single sentence, accompanied by one blank to fill. You are asked to choose the best two options that would complete the sentence’s coherence and main point from a list of six options.

 These types of questions examine your capability when it comes to conclusion making, and your ability to focus on the sentence’s meaning as a whole. They train you to look at the bigger picture but still keep an eye out for smaller details. 

Example

It was her view that the country’s problems had been _______ by foreign technocrats, so that to ask for such assistance again would be counterproductive.

A. ameliorated
B. ascertained
C. diagnosed
D. exacerbated
E. overlooked
F. worsened

Correct Answers: D and F

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • Try your best to understand the main ideas mentioned in the sentences. However, here it is mostly important to understand the whole idea at hand, by making out bullet points that can summarize the whole idea provided. Through that, the right answer will become clearer. 
  • Make sure that the pair of words you have selected makes sense and can still produce harmony and coherence in that sentence. Substitute both words in the sentence before making your final decision. Don’t rush.

To Conclude

All the information mentioned above might seem overwhelming and you might be getting ahead of yourself, but with practice and dedication, everything is possible. Stay grounded and get to know your strengths and weaknesses and get ready with your GRE preparation schedule accordingly. Do not miss any chance you get to learn and grow even more.

Here at ApexGMAT, we understand how this journey can get a little challenging and sometimes frustrating. That is why we stand by our students and support them each step of the way. 

Do not miss the chance to talk to our instructors in a 30-minute complimentary call now!

 

Contirbutor: Lilas Al-Sammak

Read more
GRE Study Plan Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Drafting It
Posted on
29
Apr 2022

GRE Study Plan – Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Drafting It

The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is a very popular exam that thousands of students take every year. A large percentage of these students find the GRE extremely challenging, so don’t worry if you feel the same way. However, if you are determined to succeed in your exam, you should have a well-developed study plan. An important aspect to consider when drafting your GRE study plan could be some of the most common mistakes that test-takers make in the creation of their study plan or schedule. In this article, we’ll give you more information on some of the most common mistakes in drafting GRE study plans and tips on how to avoid them.  

1. Dedicate enough time to preparation in your GRE study plan

The GRE is not an exam for which you can prepare within a matter of days. Although some students may be lucky enough to pass the exam with only 2-3 weeks of studying, do not rely on that. Most of them probably won’t get a satisfactory grade that will help them get into their dream school. To avoid such unpleasant situations, we suggest spending sufficient time and attention on your GRE prep. Different people take a different amount of time to prepare, so there is really no ultimate rule that applies to how early you should begin your preparation. However, it may be a good idea to start at least 3-4 months before your planned exam day in order to have enough time both for the exam preparation and the documentation part.  

The most important thing to remember is that preparing for the GRE should be a methodical process. You can’t cram it all in two weeks and expect to achieve a satisfactory result. Give yourself the time you need to succeed. Start your preparation on time and go with the pace that fits your abilities. Eventually, your persistent gradual work will pay off.

2. Prepare equally for every section of the GRE exam

While drafting their GRE study plan, many students make the mistake of devoting too much time to the section they find the hardest. When they start preparing, they get carried away with this particular section and underestimate the others. Unfortunately, this mistake often hurts their overall score. No single section should be avoided or paid less attention to. Each section is equally important for your overall score and you have to spend as much time on it as you feel you need. 

For example, the Quant is often considered the most difficult section by many students who tend to spend an enormous portion of their GRE prep time on it. However, you should not forget that you also get a large portion of your points from, for instance, the Verbal section. This means that you cannot overlook this section because you risk losing valuable points from your final result. Try to balance the different sections and spend enough time and effort on each of them, so that you can make sure you will achieve the highest result possible.

3. Take time to destress 

We have already mentioned the importance of hard and consistent work while preparing for your GRE exam. It’s now time to turn our attention to something very important, which many students wrongly neglect. Many students are very ambitious and they want to achieve a high GRE score. They are ready to work for hours and hours to perfect their knowledge and skills. However, they often end up overworking themselves and forgetting to put their minds to rest and recharge. This is a major mistake. It doesn’t matter how skillful or knowledgeable you are when you can’t put into practice what you know because you are overworked. Pushing yourself too far will not only negatively affect your score but also your mental health.

You should learn to take care of your emotional and physical health because they are crucial for gaining knowledge and building long-lasting skills required for acing the GRE. Make sure to not underestimate the power of good rest and separate enough time for it when drafting your GRE study plan. By doing this, you will be able to improve your memory and learning skills in the GRE prep process.

Conclusion

Knowing the most common mistakes that test takers make when preparing and undertaking their GRE study plan can help you avoid or deal with them effectively. Here at Apex, we know that preparing for the GRE exam day may be a challenging task. For this reason, we are more than happy to support you on your GRE journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you with every stage of your GRE journey!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

Read more
5 GRE Memorization Technique
Posted on
14
Apr 2022

5 GRE Memorization Techniques

Preparing for the GRE exam requires dedication, constant effort, and determination in order for one to achieve a satisfactory score. While there is theoretical knowledge that should be acquired and cannot be neglected, there are a few tips and tricks that you can learn relatively easily. The latter can save you some precious time so that you can focus on what is more difficult for you on the exam. Our tutors at Apex are 700+ scoring professionals who tailor their approach according to the mental and cognitive abilities of each client. Through this method of Cognitive Empathy, they help our clients learn tips on how to deal with the GRE exam and find simple solution pathways. Here are four of these GRE memorization techniques that our clients are taught.

1. Memorize the answer layout.

Some question types have the same responses. On the GRE, answers to the Data Completion Questions are presented in the same way. These being: 

  1. Quantity A is greater.
  2. Quantity B is greater.
  3. The two quantities are equal.
  4. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

As a test prepper, you can memorize these statements, given they remain the same throughout the entire GRE. We suggest memorizing a more simple form of these answer types. For example: 

  1. A is bigger
  2. B is bigger
  3. Both are equal
  4. Cannot know 

By using this as a memorization technique it will cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answer types each time you come in contact with them. 

2. Practice the vocabulary in everyday life.

Specialists argue that people can easily improve their English language skills if they broaden the size of their vocabulary by transferring words from their passive to active vocabulary. When a person knows what a certain word means but doesn’t ever use it in everyday life, this word is in their passive vocabulary. Once this word gets used when speaking or writing, it can be easily recalled from memory whenever it is needed. In this way, people can learn to use the word in a sentence while also considering the appropriate context and suitable collocations. This can be an immense benefit when preparing for the GRE, as the vocabulary section on the exam is quite challenging.

What many people do and what we would also suggest is using flashcards for memorizing the words and engraining them in your memory. Then commit to using a handful of them during the week. You can also keep a notebook with the most difficult terms, their dictionary definitions, and examples to revert back to them as your vocabulary grows.

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics.

If you are a couple of years out of school or if you are just having a hard time remembering mathematical concepts and formulas, the Quantitative portion on the GRE can seem like a daunting task. We understand this, which is why we avoid using math on the GRE all together! But sometimes, the best path is the most direct. Remember some basic math equations and formulas using the following tricks: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty! 
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction

4. Apply a visual meaning to things.

It is a common fact that people’s brains process visual stimulation much faster than textual information. That is why some people who have superior visual memory can recall visual information easily. Their brains have established relations between visual objects and data. This type of memory is very important when it comes to many academic tasks including doing reading comprehension exercises and mathematical operations. Naturally, it can be used on the GRE as well. So, if you are one of these people, or if you have never consciously used your visual memory to your advantage, this is your sign to try.

While studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. For example, when you are working on a particular math problem, stare at the radiator in your room. Then, during the exam (if you are taking the GRE online), look at the radiator once you come in contact with a similar problem. This trick will help your brain in remembering what you learned beforehand. If you are taking the GRE onsite, consider pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps fiddle with a ring on your finger while memorizing words, or wear a favorite sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices.

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often.

Reading information out of a textbook and taking notes is the approach most people have when learning. Although this may seem useful, people seem to forget most of the information they read about. For this reason, applying what you just read about in real life can be very useful. One way to do this is to practice doing questions in different locations – at a restaurant, while riding into work, while cooking dinner, etc. This will challenge your brain to think strategically in various situations and prepare it for the dynamic environment of the testing facility. You can do this both with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam. Plus it would look extra cool if you are seen jotting math equations down on a napkin while waiting for your food at a restaurant. 

These GRE memorization techniques may seem straightforward, but they require work. However, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, and thus the job you receive after graduating. While you are not your GRE, your test score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra help in preparing for the GRE, we offer extensive one-on-one tutoring with high-achieving clients. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

Read more
The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips
Posted on
25
Mar 2022

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section can be a tough nut to crack. But never fear! We’ve compiled some top tips to help you ace this section of the test. So whether you’re a math whiz or just looking to brush up on your quantitative skills, read on for everything you need to know to score high on the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section.

What does the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section test? 

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to use basic math concepts and solve problems under time pressure. While the quantitative reasoning section does assess some high-level math, it focuses primarily on real-world problem-solving skills.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Question Categories 

The math you learned in high school is mostly what’s on the GRE. The majority of GRE math questions won’t require tons of number-crunching if you know how to approach them, but they will test your critical thinking and problem solving abilities. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions will generally fall into one of four major categories: 

1. Arithmetic

The arithmetic category covers basic math concepts such as integers, fractions, and decimals. It also includes the concepts of ratio, absolute value, and sequences of numbers. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in the arithmetic category may also ask you to calculate percentages or solve word problems.  

2. Algebra

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions that fall into this category may test your ability to solve equations or inequalities. Questions in this area often require you to know the properties of basic algebraic functions (for example, solving linear and quadratic equations, equations and inequalities, factoring) as well as their graphs. 

3. Geometry

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may test your knowledge of angles, triangles 30°-60°-90°, three-dimensional figures, or coordinate geometry. Questions in geometry often ask you to calculate the area of a shape or determine the distance between two points on a plane. 

4. Data analysis

In this part, you will be asked to interpret data from graphs such as bar and circle charts, box plots, scatter plots. This includes finding the mean, median, mode, range, standard deviations, interquartile range, quartiles, and might include probability questions as well. 

An example might be two six-sided dice, each side has a number between 1 and 6. What is the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown?

There are 36 possible outcomes when two dice are thrown. Out of those, six outcomes will result in a sum of 7. This means that the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown is 6/36 or 1/6.

Format

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section is composed of two 35-minute sections. In both sections you can expect:

  • Quantitative Comparison questions

    These questions always include a column of numbers and a column labeled “A” or “B”. Your task is to compare the two columns. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may also ask you to identify which number is larger, which number lies between two other numbers, or which of two expressions is an integer.

  • Problem Solving questions

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category will test your ability to solve problems. You will be asked to determine the solution set of an equation or graph, interpret data, or solve a problem based on real-world scenarios.

  • Data Interpretation

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may ask you to interpret data presented in a table, graph, or text passage. You may also be asked to determine the relationship between variables or predict future outcomes based on trends.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Types of Questions

1. Quantitative Comparison questions

You will be given 4-option-multiple-choice questions. You will need to use your skills to determine the relationship between quantities.

Example:

Quantity A
The least prime number greater than 24

Quantity B
The greatest prime number less than 28

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given. 

Answer: For the integers greater than 24, note that 25, 26, 27, and 28 are not prime numbers, but 29 is a prime number, as are 31 and many other greater integers. Thus, 29 is the least prime number greater than 24, and Quantity A is 29. For the integers less than 28, note that 27, 26, 25, and 24 are not prime numbers, but 23 is a prime number, as are 19 and several other lesser integers. Thus, 23 is the greatest prime number less than 28, and Quantity B is a prime number less than 28. The correct answer is Choice A, Quantity A is greater.

2. Multiple-choice questions (One Answer Choice)

These are questions that have five possible answers. You need to choose the correct answer from among these choices.

Example: A certain jar contains 60 jelly beans — 22 white, 18 green, 11 yellow, 5 red, and 4 purple. If a jelly bean is to be chosen at random, what is the probability that the jelly bean will be neither red nor purple?

A. 0.09
B. 0.15
C. 0.54
D. 0.85
E. 0.91

Answer: There are 5 red and 4 purple jelly beans in the jar. That means there are 51 jelly beans that are neither red nor purple. The probability of selecting one of these is 51/60, or 0.85. The correct answer is D

3. Multi-select questions (One or More Answer Choices)

In this category you are allowed to select more than one answer choice. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in this category usually begin with a series of answer choices and present data in a table, graph, or text passage.

Example: Which of the following integers are multiples of both 2 and 3?Indicate all such integers.

A. 8
B. 9
C. 12
D. 18
E. 21
F. 36

Answer: There are a few different ways to figure out the answer. You can find the multiples of 2, which are 8, 12, 18, and 36. Then you can look for the multiples of 3, which are 12, 18, and 36. Another way to do it is if you know that every number that is a multiple of 2 and 3 is also a multiple of 6. So then you would just pick the choices that are multiples of 6. The answer is C (12), D (18), and F (36).

4. Numeric Entry Questions

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category allow you to type your own answers into empty boxes. This means that you won’t be given answers to choose from. 

Example: One pen costs $0.25 and one marker costs $0.35. At those prices, what is the total cost of 18 pens and 100 markers?

Answer: $0.25 multiplied by 18 equals $4.50. This is the cost of the 18 pens.

$0.35 multiplied by 100 equals $35.00, which is the cost of the 100 markers. The total cost is therefore 4.50 + 35.00 = $39.50. Equivalent decimals, such as $39.5 or $39.500  (or any equivalent), are considered correct answers.

Remember to only use the decimal point and negative sign when entering the numbers in the answer box. No need to add the dollar sign since it’s already added in the answer box.

Tips to Ace The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section

1. Plug in numbers

It can be very helpful to plug in numbers when you’re in doubt of the correct answer. ETS GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills but rather how well you can solve problems.

2. Memorize the answer choices 

In Quantitative Comparison questions the answers are always in the following order:

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

You should be able to answer questions within 2 minutes and, therefore, this will save you time.

3. Make sure the answer is in the correct format

In the Numeric Entry questions, you will have to fill in an empty box. Therefore, you need to make sure that you are writing your answer in the correct format. Keep an eye on questions that might ask you to round the answer. 

4. Pay extra attention to words

Make sure to spot words such as “between”, “except”, “not”, “approximately”, “about”. Make sure that you don’t round down or up. You don’t want to lose points because you misread the question when you actually knew the correct answer. 

5. Process of elimination

The strategy of eliminating wrong answers can be your best friend. If you’re having trouble with GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions, you can always use the process of elimination to help you narrow your choices.

6. Do practice questions

Practicing will help you to become familiar with the examination pattern. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section contains many similar questions with slight variations on the same concept. Practicing will help you be more relaxed and confident on the day of the exam. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning tests your understanding and not just your ability to remember formulas or mathematical concepts. 

Keep in mind that on the exam day, you can use a basic calculator. So make sure you are using a simple calculator while practicing because you won’t have extra features on the exam.

GRE Private tutoring

If you are not comfortable with GRE Quantitative Reasoning, if you find it difficult, or if you are not confident with your math skills, you can always sign up for private GRE tutoring. Apex private GRE tutors focus on your needs and personal strengths, tailoring personalized GRE lessons to best help you achieve your goals.

Remember, the GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills, but rather how well you can solve problems. The best way to do well on this exam is to familiarize yourself with the types of questions by practicing. We hope these insights have been helpful so far, but if not, feel free to reach out anytime with more specific inquiries.

 

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more
GRE Quantitative Section
Posted on
11
Mar 2022

GRE Quantitative Section – Everything You Need To Know!

If you are planning to apply to graduate schools, business schools, or even law schools, then you probably know by now that your GRE score is an essential part of your application. More likely than not, you have already begun studying for the GRE. In today’s article, the main focus will be on the GRE’s Quantitative (or Math) Section and what this section is all about.

The quantitative section in the GRE tends to measure your ability to solve problems and reason quantitatively. Besides that, it tests your basic mathematical skills and your capabilities to comprehend elementary mathematical concepts. All this can sound a little pressuring and frightening at first but when you get familiar with the section, you will feel much more confident. Remember, everything you need for the GRE quant section you already learned in high school. 

The GRE Quantitative Section: The Layout

To start, the quantitative section consists of Data Interpretation, Quantitative Comparison, and Problem Solving questions. You are given 35 minutes to finish each of these sections. With 20 questions in each section, you will have between 1.5 to 2 minutes to solve each question.

The distribution of these sections is as follows:

     1. Quantitative Comparison Questions
     2. Problem – Solving Questions
     3. Data Interpretation Questions


The GRE Quantitative Section: Quantitative Comparison Questions

When it comes to the quantitative comparison questions, you are given 2 quantities – A and B and are asked to pick out the connection between them. Connections like Quantity A is greater than Quantity B, Quantity B is smaller than Quantity A, or the two Quantities are equal.

You will most probably see around 8 of these questions in your quantitative sections.

The Quantitative Comparison section is there to measure your ability to link concepts and to find relationships between mathematical matters in general. Alongside that, it tests your skills to reason quantitatively.

 Example: 

                                                     y>4

             Quantity A                                               Quantity B

             (3y+2) / 5                                                        y

(A) Quantity A is greater
(B) Quantity B is greater
(C) The two quantities are equal
(D) The relationship cannot be determined from the information given

Answer: B


The GRE Quantitative Section: Problem Solving Questions

Often Problem Solving Questions are asked in the form of multiple-choice questions. You are given 5 answers to choose from but only one of them is correct. The format of these questions can also vary – you should expect to be asked to enter answers in a blank box (Type Your Numeric Answer Questions).

You will face around 6 to 7 Problem-Solving Questions during your GRE exam.

These types of questions test your problem-solving skills as well as your knowledge of basic math. Your strategic mathematical calculations are also evaluated.

Example: 

At Store T, the dollar amount of sales for 2007 was what percent of the dollar amount of sales for 2008?

Give your answer to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Answer: 108.7% (or equivalent) 


The GRE Quantitative Section: Data Interpretation Questions

These types of questions are correlated to graphs and/or charts. Answers to these types of questions should be derived from these given graphs and charts. Analyzing and understanding them would be the most important factor to guarantee you points on the Data Interpretation Questions.

Your skills in comprehending elementary mathematical concepts are tested here.

Example: 

Store

Percent Change from 2006 to 2007 Percent Change from 2007 to 2008

P

10

-10

Q

-20

9

R

5

12

S

-7

-15

T 17

-8

Annual Percent Change in Dollar Amount of Sales at Five Retail Stores from 2006 to 2008.

If the dollar amount of sales at Store P was $800,000 for 2006, what was the dollar amount of sales at that store for 2008?

(A) $727,200
(B) $792,000
(C) $800,000

(D) $880,000
(E) $968,000

Answer: B


Apex Tips to Ace Your GRE Quantitative (or Math) Section

1. Avoid doing the math
As ironic as that sounds, if you are doing complex, long calculations, you are likely to be doing something wrong. To ace the Math Section during your GRE, try to find methods that can help you solve the problem without drilling on calculations. This way, you will see things differently without using your calculator and wasting time.

2. Guess if you are unsure
You are gaining points upon every correct answer. Do not waste your time trying to find the answer to something you are unsure of. Plan to find the answer to a question within a minute and a half. If it is taking more than that, then guess the answer by elimination and move on to the next question.

3. Do not let your math anxiety get the best of you
If you feel like you are getting anxious during your prep journey or even during your exam, take a minute to breathe and gather yourself. Math is much easier if you don’t let it get the best of you.

With our help and your dedication and hard work, you have nothing to worry about. Book your free consultation session with one of our top-scoring GRE tutors here

You are one step closer to acing your GRE Math Section!


Contributor
: Lilas Al-Sammak

Read more
Help with GRE Anxiety
Posted on
04
Mar 2022

Pro Tips to Help With Your GRE Anxiety

Are you feeling stressed about the GRE test? You’re not alone. Most students feel anxious about standardized tests every year. Test anxiety can have a significant impact on your grades and performance. In order to achieve your desired score on the GRE, it is important to adopt ways to work with or overcome your testing anxiety. There are plenty of ways to help with GRE stress and perform your best on test day.

1. Understand why you’re feeling anxious and what’s causing your stress

Figure out the source of your anxiety and formulate a plan to cope with it.  Some common sources of GRE test anxiety include:

    •     Fear about not doing as well as you think you should.
    •     Pressure from family and/or friends.
    •     Worrying about rules regarding time or breaks during the test.
    •     Worrying that you’ll lose your cool or forget information in the middle of a section.

Once you’ve figured out what’s causing your anxiety, develop a plan to help you overcome them. Remember, a little anxiety is a good thing – and completely normal! 

2. Prepare as much as possible

Do plenty of research on the GRE test, find out when and where you are supposed to show up, what to bring with you, etc. All this information will help with GRE anxiety and relieve some pressure once the big day finally arrives. We suggest practicing getting to the GRE testing site before test day so that you know how to get there when the day arrives. 

Prepare for “what ifs”. Anticipate different scenarios that could happen during your exam day so that there is no room for surprises. For example, what if you run out of time and can’t finish a section? (We suggest fine-tuning your internal clock while prepping for the exam so that you can have a good sense of how to pace yourself come text day) Having all of this information will provide you with a clear plan to put into action if these circumstances arise.

3. Practice 

This is a tried and tested method of helping with GRE anxiety. Take several practice tests under timed conditions to simulate the actual GRE as closely as possible. Figure out what time limits work best for you and how much time you’ll need to complete each section of the real GRE. We work with our clients to develop their internal clock. A good test taker may look at the clock once or twice during the test. A great test-taker will never have to look at the clock once! 

The GRE test is designed to be challenging. Don’t get discouraged if you are struggling with some concepts or don’t do as well as you would have liked on a practice test. But keep in mind, when you’re doing practice tests you’re not learning! You’re putting your knowledge to the test.

4. Get plenty of rest and eat healthily

A good night’s rest and a healthy diet can work wonders for your performance. Try to plan a schedule that gives you plenty of time to sleep at night, and allows for some time in the morning to get rid of any excess energy. This will help with GRE anxiety by keeping your mind clear and more focused to take in information.

Self Talk Do's and Don'tsSelf Talk Do's and Don'tsSelf Talk Do's and Don'ts

5. Self-talk 

Be your own cheerleader. Keep telling yourself that you’re going to do great and it will help you stay positive, help with GRE anxiety and help manage stress.

Remember that you’ve prepared well. If things start to get overwhelming, tell yourself everything is OK and remind yourself why you prepared so hard for this test. When you feel stressed, take a moment to breathe deeply. This can help with GRE anxiety and calm you down.

6. Talk about what’s bothering you with someone close to you

A parent, a close friend, or someone else you trust can be a great tool for alleviating your anxieties. Try to find help with GRE anxiety from those around you and not only help yourself but help them as well.

Discussing your concerns with someone you trust might help reduce the stress associated with the test. You can help with GRE anxiety by turning some of that anxious energy into productive conversation. Don’t be afraid of help and support – ask for it! Doesn’t matter if it’s help with GRE anxiety, help in some other area in your life, or just some simple advice. No one goes it alone. 

7. Private GRE tutoring

If you are still struggling to overcome your anxiety, private help is available. A good private tutor can help you find strategies to overcome your anxiety regarding your test performance and help you truly learn the material.

A great tutor will help you feel less alone during this process. They can also guide you when it comes to test pressure and help you improve your test performance.

Conclusion 

Finally, remember that this is just one test you will take in your life, and it’s not worth sacrificing your (mental) health or happiness over. You can do great things with your life regardless of your GRE score. Focus on what matters to you the most and strive for success. There is no “pass” or “fail” when it comes to life.

 

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more
GRE Tips
Posted on
25
Feb 2022

Top 5 GRE Tips For The Exam Day

If you are interested in attending graduate school, you may have already started considering taking the GRE exam. This is a standardized exam that not only tests your knowledge and skills but also reveals your potential when applying to graduate schools. If you want to earn a high score, you have to consider different aspects during your preparation, including useful strategies to use on the day of the test. Below you can find our top 5 GRE tips to keep in mind during the exam!

1. Answer every question

There is no negative marking on the GRE. This means that you will face no penalty if you guess on some of the questions. If you aren’t sure about a particular question, it would be better to guess what the correct answer is rather than leave the question unanswered. Try to make a quick, but also educated guess. Even though it may not be the correct answer, by trying you can only gain points. In comparison, leaving a question unanswered will definitely bring you no points. Try your chance, it may be your lucky day, and you may even get it right!

2. Starting with the easy questions

All GRE questions in one section are worth the same points. Thus, you should start answering the questions that you are sure of and collect the “easier” points first. Whenever you come across a hard question, skip it for the moment and go back to it later. You can always use the marking function during the GRE exam to indicate which questions aren’t answered yet. When you are done with the rest of the questions in the section and have earned “all the easy points”, complete your marked questions. Then, review the questions you were unable to answer since you may be able to answer them when you return to them a second time.

3. Use the process of elimination

When you are not sure of the correct answer to a particular question, use the process of elimination. When you eliminate the incorrect answers you are closer to getting the correct answer. This increases your odds of picking the correct answer and getting some extra points from the question.

4. Read every question carefully

Reading your questions carefully and understanding what you are expected to do is crucial for success on the GRE exam. Many students often make careless reading mistakes which result in awkward answer choices. Some of them include misreading a word like “not” or “except” or formatting an answer to a math problem in the wrong way. All this can be avoided if you adopt the essential GRE tip of reading closely! 

5. Keep your pace

You have to keep an eye on the time and have a clear plan on how to organize it while taking the GRE test. The Verbal and Quant sections have 20 questions each. The Verbal section is 30 minutes long, which means you have about 1:30 minutes per question. The Quant section is 35 minutes, meaning you have about 1:45 min per question. You may want to practice sticking to these time limits so that you can ensure that you will have enough time for every question. Some questions may take you longer, but still, this is a good general guideline to follow in order to organize your time effectively.

 

To Review

Learning useful GRE tips and tricks for solving the exam can become a game-changer and help you skyrocket your score. Here at Apex, we know that preparing for the GRE exam day may be a challenging task. For this reason, we are more than happy to support you on your GRE journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace your GRE exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

Read more