GRE Verbal Questions
Posted on
13
May 2022

GRE Verbal Questions – Expert Tips On How To Solve Them

The Graduate Record Examinations, also known as the GRE, is a standardized exam done for the purpose to assess the test taker’s ability to think outside the box when it comes to analytical writing, mathematics, and vocabulary. The majority of GRE test takers are students looking into Business Schools and in some cases Law Schools and also students considering  Master’s ( M.A., M.S., M.Ed.), MBA’s, or Doctorate (Ph.D., Ed.D.).

Now, what is the GRE made up of? The GRE consists of three main sections: Analytical Writing Assessment, Quantitative, and Verbal. All these sections sum up to a total score of a minimum of 260 and a maximum of 340. To break it up, each section of the GRE takes up a specific percentage out of the total score. Both the Verbal and the Quantitative Reasoning scorer lay on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments. The Analytical Writing, however, lays on a 0-6 score scale, in half-point increments. 

In today’s read, our main focus will be on the GRE’s Verbal Section and questions.

The GRE Verbal Section

The GRE Verbal section consists of around 20 questions that need to be completed within 30 minutes. This leaves you with approximately between one minute to four minutes per question, depending on the question type. The order in which the question types appear is as follows:

  • Text Completion
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Sentence Equivalence

1. GRE Verbal – Text Completion Questions

For these GRE Verbal questions, you are provided with a small passage made up of one to six sentences, with one to three blank spaces to fill in. It is asked of you to fill in the blank space with the most suitable option provided to you. When it comes to the forms in which these questions can come in, there are two distinctive forms. In that passage, you might have three blank spaces to fill in, and for that, there is a list of three options to choose from per blank space. You can also come across questions that have one blank space per passage. To fill it in, you are given a list of five options. In both cases, there is only one right answer.

Here, your ability to interpret and understand the full picture is tested. You are expected to fully comprehend what you are given so that you can put the missing pieces together and still get a harmonious passage.

Example

In parts of the Arctic, the land grades into the landfast ice so _______ that you can walk off the coast and not know you are over the hidden sea.

(A) permanently
(B) imperceptibly
(C) irregularly
(D) precariously
(E) relentlessly

Correct Answer:  B

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • Before anything, take a step back and make sure that the whole passage’s idea makes sense to you. Do you feel like all the points are clear to you? Do you feel confident in completing the sentence? This is important because your answers are fully based on your understanding of the passage. If you missed the passage’s main purpose, chances are, you missed the points to its questions too. 
  • While reading, in your own words, try to predict what might come next in the passage. Try to complete the text while reading and see if the harmony is still there. When you’re done with that, move on to the next step, and try to link your predictions for the text completion with the options given. If you could not find the exact same completion, choose the option with the closest concept. Trust your gut. 

2. GRE Verbal – Reading Comprehension Questions

These types of questions come in three different forms, which are:

a. Select-in-Passage: This form of question requires your referral back to the given passage for the reason of direct extraction. That means you have to select a sentence directly from the given passage that best suits a certain description that you are asked to substitute.

b. Multiple-Choice Questions – Select One Answer: The classical and traditional multiple-choice questions you are used to with five answer options for you to choose from.

c. Multiple-Choice Questions – Select One or More Answers: This last form of Reading Comprehension questions gives you a list of three answer options, and you are asked to select all the answers that you think are correct and suitable. This means that your selected answers can be one, two, or even three.

All these questions are there to evaluate your ability to summarize, identify writers’ points of view, understand larger pieces of text, draw conclusions, and to be able to reason from given information.

Example

Questions 1 to 3 are based on this passage

Reviving the practice of using elements of popular music in classical composition, an approach that had been in hibernation in the United States during the 1960s, composer Philip Glass (born 1937) embraced the ethos of popular music in his compositions. Glass based two symphonies on music by rock musicians David Bowie and Brian Eno, but the symphonies’ sound is distinctively his. Popular elements do not appear out of place in Glass’s classical music, which from its early days has shared certain harmonies and rhythms with rock music. Yet this use of popular elements has not made Glass a composer of popular music. His music is not a version of popular music packaged to attract classical listeners; it is high art for listeners steeped in rock rather than the classics.

Select only one answer choice.

1. The passage addresses which of the following issues related to Glass’s use of popular elements in his classical compositions?

A. How it is regarded by listeners who prefer rock to the classics
B. How it has affected the commercial success of Glass’s music

C. Whether it has contributed to a revival of interest among other composers in using popular elements in their compositions
D. Whether it has had a detrimental effect on Glass’s reputation as a composer of classical music
E. Whether it has caused certain of Glass’s works to be derivative in quality

Consider each of the three choices separately and select all that apply. 

2. The passage suggests that Glass’s work displays which of the following qualities?

A. A return to the use of popular music in classical compositions
B. An attempt to elevate rock music to an artistic status more closely approximating that of classical music
C. A long-standing tendency to incorporate elements from two apparently disparate musical styles

3. Select the sentence that distinguishes two ways of integrating rock and classical music.

Correct Answers:
1. E
2. A and C

3. The correct answer is the last sentence of the passage.

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • When answering, try to derive the answer from the basis of the information given. This means that no outside knowledge is needed nor accepted.  Make sure that you try to find the answers from the provided information. You might feel like the presented views in the passage are the exact opposite of yours, and for that reason, go into the exam with an open mind and expect to encounter different points of view.
  • These types of questions revolve around different and variant topics like sciences, business, art and humanities, and/ or recent topics that can be academic or nonacademic. If by any chance you were unfamiliar with the material provided, don’t panic! All the questions asked can be answered nonetheless. Keep in mind, though, if you feel like the passage is too difficult for you, save it for last and move on to the next question.

3. GRE Verbal – Sentence Equivalence Questions

These types of questions can seem a little similar to the Sentence Equivalence questions. That being said, these two question types assess your ability to draw conclusions and test your capabilities to be able to complete passages while being given only partial information.  

Sentence Equivalence Questions include a single sentence, accompanied by one blank to fill. You are asked to choose the best two options that would complete the sentence’s coherence and main point from a list of six options.

 These types of questions examine your capability when it comes to conclusion making, and your ability to focus on the sentence’s meaning as a whole. They train you to look at the bigger picture but still keep an eye out for smaller details. 

Example

It was her view that the country’s problems had been _______ by foreign technocrats, so that to ask for such assistance again would be counterproductive.

A. ameliorated
B. ascertained
C. diagnosed
D. exacerbated
E. overlooked
F. worsened

Correct Answers: D and F

Apex’s Expert Tips

  • Try your best to understand the main ideas mentioned in the sentences. However, here it is mostly important to understand the whole idea at hand, by making out bullet points that can summarize the whole idea provided. Through that, the right answer will become clearer. 
  • Make sure that the pair of words you have selected makes sense and can still produce harmony and coherence in that sentence. Substitute both words in the sentence before making your final decision. Don’t rush.

To Conclude

All the information mentioned above might seem overwhelming and you might be getting ahead of yourself, but with practice and dedication, everything is possible. Stay grounded and get to know your strengths and weaknesses and get ready with your GRE preparation schedule accordingly. Do not miss any chance you get to learn and grow even more.

Here at ApexGMAT, we understand how this journey can get a little challenging and sometimes frustrating. That is why we stand by our students and support them each step of the way. 

Do not miss the chance to talk to our instructors in a 30-minute complimentary call now!

 

Contirbutor: Lilas Al-Sammak

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GRE Quantitative
Posted on
15
Oct 2021

Everything about the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE

By: ApexGMAT
Contributor: Simona Mkhitaryan
Date: October 15, 2021

As mentioned in the previous Article, GRE consists of 3 main sections: Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning, and Quantitative Reasoning. There is also one unscored section which can be either quantitative or verbal. This article concentrates on the Quantitative Reasoning section of GRE. 

How long is the Quantitative Reasoning section? 

The Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE has 20 questions with a total of 35 minutes, 1.5 to 2 minutes to answer each question. It is helpful to know that the number of question types included in the exam is different. The Quantitative Comparison questions come first, then Problem Solving questions and Data Interpretation questions, presented as a set at the end of the section. 

What does Quantitative Reasoning measure, and why is it important?

The quantitative reasoning section of GRE measures the ability to solve different types of mathematical problems, interpret and analyze quantitative data, demonstrate basic knowledge of algebra, geometry, data analysis, and arithmetic. The test does not cover trigonometry, calculus, or higher-level math; it will be enough to have the level of Algebra 2. 

  • Arithmetic: This section includes problems connected with divisibility, factorization, working with prime numbers, remainders, odd/even integers. It also touches upon topics such as arithmetic operations, exponents, roots, and other topics such as estimation, percent, ratio, rate, absolute value, number line, decimal representation, as well as sequences of numbers. An example can be ‘What are the factors of 13’, or ‘Which of the following is closest to the square root of 10.5’?
  • Algebra: This part mostly concentrates on equations and functions such as factoring and simplifying functions, and working with inequalities. It also includes coordinate geometry that is working with graphs of functions, intercepts, and slopes of lines. Examples include find the distance between the points (-4 , -6) and (-1 , -2) or solve the equation |- 2 x + 2| – 3 = -3 or find the x-intercept of the equation 2x – 4y = 9.
  • Geometry: This area covers topics related to 2-dimensional figures and three-dimensional figures: parallel and perpendicular lines, circles, triangles, quadrilaterals, other polygons, congruent and similar figures, area, perimeter, volume, and concepts such as the Pythagorean theorem and angle measurement in degrees. For instance, find the hypotenuse of the triangle using the Pythagorean theorem, or triangles ABC and A’B’C’ are similar figures; find the length AB if you know the ratio between the triangles.
  • Data analysis: This part is mainly focused on interpreting data from graphs such as bar and circle graphs; box plots, and scatter plots; finding the mean, median, mode, range, standard deviation, interquartile range, quartiles, and percentiles, analyzing frequency distributions, probability types of questions as well as counting methods such as combinations, permutations, and Venn diagrams. Examples include when a number x is added to the data set 4, 8, 20, 25, 32, the new mean is 15. Find the value of x. Another one is on a six-sided die; each side has a number between 1 and 6. What is the probability of throwing a three or a 4?
What types of questions does the GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section include? 

There are four types of questions in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section:

  • Quantitative Comparison Questions – These types of questions are similar to the “Data Sufficiency” questions on the GMAT. 2 values will be given and four options to choose from such as 1) quantity X is bigger, 2) quantity Y is bigger, 3) the quantities are equal, 4) there’s not enough information to know which is bigger.
  • Multiple-choice Questions with one correct answer – usually Problem solving questions or data interpretation.
  • Multiple-choice Questions with more than one answer. – usually, Problem-solving questions, which are much like quantitative questions on the SAT or data interpretation.
  • Numeric Entry Questions – Problem-solving or data interpretation. 

The questions can appear independently or as a group of questions usually associated with a “Data interpretation” set. The data is generally displayed in graphs, tables, charts, or other informational displays. Some of the questions on the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE are purely mathematical. However, there are also real-life problems and word problems that must be interpreted and solved mathematically. 

Is a calculator allowed on the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE?

Unlike the GMAT, using a specific GRE calculator during the Quantitative Reasoning section is permitted. For paper-delivered GRE, the GRE calculator will be provided during the test, but the examinees cannot bring their own to the exam. For computer-based GRE, one can use the on-screen calculator. However, simple calculations are often quicker and safer to solve without a calculator to avoid entry errors. As mentioned, not all calculators are allowed during the exam. 

So, what can the GRE calculator be used for?  

  • Add, subtract, divide, multiply 
  • Parenthesize
  • Take the square root of
  • Add a decimal to 
  • Change signs
  • Store the answers via memory keys
  • Display up to eight digits at a time

The calculator doesn’t include exponents, constants like π or e, logarithmic (ln, log) or trigonometric (sine, cosine, tangent) functions, nested parentheses, or the ability to square or cube. 

What is the maximum score for the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE? 

Each QR and VR are scored on a range of 130-170 points, making the highest possible score on the GRE a 340. Additionally, it is essential to know that the GRE is a section-adaptive test. Within each section, all questions are in the same level of complexity and are contributed equally to the final score. Unlike GMAT, GRE is adaptive at the level of the section. This means that the questions will not change within each section, yet the second complete set of 20 questions in the next section will.

How to prepare for the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE

First of all, it is vital to learn the structure of the questions: In order to get familiar with the types of questions, the easiest way is to take various practice tests to become familiar with the format and then concentrate on actually solving the problems and getting the highest score possible. Find out practice problems can be found in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Problems. 

Thus, it is also essential to set a target score: Taking a practice test is an excellent starting point. This determines the level of your initial score. It also helps to identify how much time one has to allocate to the preparation to improve their score and achieve their goal target. 

Make a study plan and stick with the schedule: It is vital to design a personalized study plan to guide throughout the preparation, decide what sources and courses one needs, whether they are going to prepare only with tests, or go step by step through topics and types of quant questions moreover considering to take courses with a GRE private tutor, with whom one will get a lot of help and guidance in their GRE preparation creed. For more information about the Quant GRE tutoring and preparation, visit https://apexgre.com/inquire-now/.

Also, sticking to the study schedule is critical since one has to continue studying consistently in order to see progress, especially when the talk is about mathematics. 

Conclusion:

In conclusion, as mentioned above, the quant section of GRE has four types of questions that measure the ability to understand and solve the basic problems of mathematics, which also include data interpretation. A calculator will be provided during the QR section. Additionally, the QR section of the GRE required comprehensive studies and preparation; that is why it is useful to schedule and start preparing for the exam a few months earlier.

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10 things you should consider before you begin your GRE prep
Posted on
17
Sep 2021

10 Things You Should Consider Before You Begin Your GRE Exam Prep

By: ApexGMAT
Contributor: Simona Mkhitaryan
Date: September 17, 2021

The Structure of GRE Exam 

The GRE test is a 3-hour 45-minutes (10 minutes break, included) exam with 3 main sections:  Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and an unidentified/unscored section. The Analytical Writing section will always be the first section, then the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and unidentified/unscored sections may appear in any order. The unscored experimental section can be either quantitative or verbal.

The GRE can be taken in two formats: computer-based and paper test. The content for each type of test is the same, but there can be some differences between the timing and the number of questions. 

Scores: The official GRE scores for computer-based exams are available within 10-15 days after the test date and for paper-delivered tests within five weeks. The scores will also be sent to the particular institutions you want. 

Retaking process: When taking the paper-delivered test, you can retake the GRE as many times as you want. However, if you took the GRE test via computer, you can retake it once every 21 days and up to five times a year.

Cost: The standard fee for GRE is US$205. 

GRE Sections

2 GRE Sections are Section-Level Adaptive 

The GRE Quantitative and Verbal Reasoning sections are section-level adaptive. So, what does it mean? It means that an algorithm selects successive sections based on the previous sections’ performance. The final score is then composed of each section’s score equally. 

GRE Scores are Valid for Five Years

GRE test score is valid for five years. Hence, before taking or preparing for the GRE, it is essential to know the validity of the exam to plan when to take the GRE properly. If you already have a particular school or program you want to apply to, you have to schedule your test based on the deadlines the school has defined. Nonetheless, it would also be good if you keep in mind the validity time frame on the off chance that you are as yet uncertain about when you will apply to schools.

The Maximum Score of GRE Exam

The highest total GRE score is 340, a 170 both for Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning. Unlike other tests, GRE scores are presented separately. So, when you send your GRE results you will probably send three separate scores for each section. Moreover, the Analytical Writing Section is scored on an independent scale from 0-6. If you already know which university you are going to apply to, pay attention to whether the university or program has any section preferences or not. 

Average GRE Scores

GRE Score Ranges

The GRE Calculator 

Unlike the GMAT, you can use a specific GRE calculator during the Quantitative Reasoning section. For paper-delivered GRE, the GRE calculator will be provided during the test, but you cannot bring your own to the exam. For computer-based GRE you can use the on-screen calculator. However, simple calculations are often quicker and safer to solve without a calculator, to avoid entry errors.

As mentioned not all calculators are allowed during the exam. So, what GRE calculator can be used for?  

  • Add, subtract, divide, multiply 
  • Parenthesize
  • Take the square root of
  • Add a decimal to 
  • Change signs
  • Store the answers via memory keys
  • Display up to eight digits at a time

The calculator doesn’t include exponents, constants like π or e, logarithmic (ln, log) or trigonometric (sine, cosine, tangent) functions, nested parentheses, or the ability to square or cube. 

GRE Exam Acceptance and Graduate Programs

The GRE as the GMAT is a common and widely accepted exam for graduate programs. It is common in the USA, Canada, Australia, etc. As GMAT usually serves for the MBA Program, the GRE is recognized by several business schools and has GRE Subject tests which are available in fields such as chemistry, mathematics, physics, biology, literature in English, and psychology. So, as a matter of fact, the GRE is used not only in business programs but also in various areas.

Defining Strengths and Weaknesses  

This analysis will help you know what you are good at and what you need to improve. First of all, plan your strategy about how you are going to analyze your weaknesses and strengths. It can be by taking the GRE practice test once and then figuring out which areas you felt particularly weak or strong in.

Another option is to maintain a notebook for a week and mark down the weaknesses and strengths you encounter during your initial studying. Via this analysis, you might get a sense of whether you are good at time management, what your speed is, and much more. During the analysis, try to identify which question types are the most challenging for you in each section. Figure out what soft skills you have that might help you during the exam and pinpoint the ones that need improvement. After that, conclude and start working on developing new skills and overcoming weaknesses. Always keep in mind having a realistically achievable goal for the final target as a score. Scoring a 300 + on the GRE exam isn’t an easy thing! 

Developing a Study Schedule 

After acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses, design a personalized study plan to guide you throughout your preparation, decide what sources and courses you need, whether you are going to prepare only with tests, or go step by step through topics and sections. You should start preparing for the GRE at least three to six months before the test date, so try not to cram at the last minute! Schedule your learning format and decide which strategy fits the best with your prep level.

You might also consider taking courses with a GRE private tutor, from whom you will get a lot of help and guidance in your GRE preparation creed. This will make your prep easier since you will stick to your study schedule and know ahead of time when you should be studying. Hence, prioritizing your GRE study schedule and then fitting the rest of your day around it will be more effective.  

Using Flashcards and Other Study Methods to Prep for the GRE Exam 

During GRE preparation, it is vital to use practical and helpful materials that will guide your preparation process. It is essential to know which study method works best. Eventually, most of the time, GRE requires self-study mode. However, besides that, you can take online GRE classes, in-person GRE classes, and finally prepare with a private tutor/instructor who will help you with their knowledge and experience.

Flashcards are another great way to study and make quick notes on GRE sections. While preparing for the GRE, the Verbal Reasoning section tests the knowledge of advanced and sophisticated vocabulary. It is an excellent way to write the words on flashcards and start practicing. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions test your knowledge of four main subjects you need to concentrate on while preparing and practicing for the GRE: Algebra, Arithmetic, Data Analysis, and Geometry. Hence, make sure to use the right and most comfortable study methods that fit your schedule the most. 

The GRE Exam Timing 

 When preparing for the GRE, try to keep track of your time to allocate it equally to each section. However, do this step after identifying what concepts are complicated for you to allocate more time on those topics and train yourself to solve those problems. Practice pacing because, during the  GRE, time management is critical to complete the exam. The worst scenario in the GRE is that sometimes the test takers run out of time towards the end. This is because some of the test takers do not stick with the time and fall behind. Thus, set and stick to certain time milestones to finish the exam on time. Getting every question on the GRE right doesn’t do you much good if you can’t answer all the questions within the time limit. 

Conclusion 

In conclusion, before preparing for the GRE, be sure to first familiarize yourself with the  GRE structure, the cost, maximum score, acceptance, GRE calculator, and format. Then define your weaknesses and strengths, develop a study plan, use different study methods and hit the green light! Finally, while practicing for the GRE, try to keep track of time and concentrate on learning rather than answering all the questions correctly. 

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