GMAT or GRE
Posted on
28
Sep 2022

GMAT or GRE: What’s the difference?

If you are considering pursuing a graduate degree, you will likely need to take either the GMAT or GRE exam. While both exams are used for admission into graduate programs, there are some key differences between the two.

Both the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are standardized tests that have a lot in common in terms of their purpose.  But GMAT is required for admission to most business schools while GRE is accepted by most graduate schools.  But how do they differ?

GMAT or GRE: How are they different?

GMAT GRE
What are they? A standardized test required by most business schools. A standardized test required by most graduate schools, including many business schools.
Format The GMAT has four sections. A 31-minute Quantitative Reasoning section, a 65-minute Verbal Reasoning section, a 30-minute Integrated Reasoning section, and a 30-minute Analytical Writing section.  The GRE has four sections. Two 35-minute Quantitative Reasoning sections, Two 35-minute Verbal Reasoning sections,  a 60- minute Analytical Writing, and one unscored section that could be verbal or quantitative.
Testing time 3.5 hrs 3.75 hrs
Scoring GMAT is scored on a scale of 200-800 in increments of 10.  GRE is scored on a scale of 130-170 in increments of 1. 
Cost The GMAT costs $250 with a $35 fee for each score report sent after the first five free reports. The GRE costs $205 with a $50 fee for each score report sent after the first four free reports.
Validity 5 years 5 years

GMAT or GRE: Which exam to take?

That depends on your future plans after you complete your degree. Most people choose to take the GMAT because it’s tailored specifically for business school applicants. But if you’re interested in other graduate programs as well, or you want a more comprehensive test that covers more topics, then the GRE might be a better option for you.

Also, it’s always best to check with the schools that you intend to attend and see which test they prefer. 

GMAT or GRE: Bottom line

Both tests are designed to measure a person’s ability to think critically and solve problems. The GMAT is specifically geared towards students who want to pursue a career in business, while the GRE is more general and can be used for admission into a variety of graduate programs.

If you need help deciding which exam to take or preparing for either of them, reach out to our tutors at ApexGRE or ApexGMAT for private personalized tutoring sessions. We offer 30-minute complimentary consultations with one of the top-scoring instructors.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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LSAT or GRE: What’s the difference?

Are you applying or thinking about applying to graduate school but can’t decide which standardized entrance exam fits your desired program best?

The answer depends on what you’re planning to do after you complete your degree. If you’re not sure, it’s best to check with the schools that you are interested in attending to see which test they prefer. In the meantime, here is a breakdown of the LSAT and GRE so you can start comparing which suits your skill set and future goals best.

LSAT or GRE: What are they?

Both the GRE and LSAT are standardized tests that have a lot in common in terms of their purpose but differ when it comes to their content.

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test that law school applicants must take in order to be admitted to law school. The GRE, or Graduate Record Examination, is a general test that many graduate programs require as part of the admission process. But how do they differ?

LSAT or GRE: Format

The GRE has three multiple-choice sections, Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, Analytical Writing, and one unscored section that could be verbal or quantitative.

The LSAT exam sections are Reading Comprehension, Analytical Reasoning, and Logical Reasoning. The LSAT also contains an experimental section in addition to five multiple-choice sections (one of which is an unscored writing sample).

LSAT or GRE: Scoring system

LSAT is scored on a scale of 120-180, while the GRE uses 130-170 for their verbal and quantitative sections and 0-60 for analytical writing.

LSAT or GRE: The skills

Both exams measure skills that are important for success in graduate school, but they focus on different areas.

LSAT tests your ability to read, analyze and draw conclusions on complex texts under strict time constraints. LSAT is a logic test that will measure your logical reasoning and analytical thinking abilities.

The GRE, on the other hand, tests a wider range of skills. In addition to your ability to reason and analyze, the GRE also measures your quantitative abilities (math skills), verbal abilities, and critical thinking skills.

LSAT or GRE: Cost

LSAT costs $200 to take without the additional fees such as the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) ($195), and Law School Reports ($45). The cost of taking the LSAT can add up quickly if you decide to retake the LSAT.

GRE costs $205 with a $50 fee for each score report sent after the first four free reports.

LSAT or GRE: Which schools accept them?

You may have heard that the LSAT is the only test that law schools accept, but that’s not always the case. The GRE is also accepted by some law schools (see the list below). If you’re interested in going to law school, then the LSAT is the obvious choice. But LSAT is a test that is also accepted at some business schools, especially for JD/MBA.

Programs that accept both GRE and LSAT

University LSAT score GRE score
Harvard Law School 173 332
Yale Law School 173 332
Columbia Law School 172 329
Cornell Law School 171 324
University of Pennsylvania Penn Law 171 328

MBA programs that accept LSAT

Ross School of Business: GRE score: 320
Emory University’s Goizueta Business School: GRE score: 317

LSAT or GRE: Which graduate program do people choose?

The people who take the LSAT are more likely to go into law school while the people who take the GRE are more likely to go into other graduate programs. However, there is no one-size-fits-all answer and you should consider your skills and future goals when making your decision.

LSAT or GRE: The bottom line

Both the LSAT and the GRE can be challenging and have many similarities, but they’re not alike. Understanding the difference between these two exams can help you make an informed decision about which one to take. If you want a test that’s specifically designed for law school admissions, then go with the LSAT; if you need something more widely accepted or with year-round testing opportunities, take the GRE instead. But keep in mind that the GRE is not accepted by all law schools. Which test you choose depends on your own strengths and weaknesses. So, if you’re confident in your math skills and want to focus on your verbal abilities, the LSAT may be a better fit.

If you’re interested in taking a prep course for either exam, reach out to our tutors at ApexGRE or ApexLSAT. We offer 30-minute complimentary consultation calls where you can speak directly to a top-scoring instructor for the best and most comprehensive preparation courses. Still not sure? Read our comparison article between the GMAT and GRE.

So which is it? LSAT or GRE? Let us help you. Get in touch now.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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5 GRE Memorization Technique
Posted on
14
Apr 2022

5 GRE Memorization Techniques

Preparing for the GRE exam requires dedication, constant effort, and determination in order for one to achieve a satisfactory score. While there is theoretical knowledge that should be acquired and cannot be neglected, there are a few tips and tricks that you can learn relatively easily. The latter can save you some precious time so that you can focus on what is more difficult for you on the exam. Our tutors at Apex are 700+ scoring professionals who tailor their approach according to the mental and cognitive abilities of each client. Through this method of Cognitive Empathy, they help our clients learn tips on how to deal with the GRE exam and find simple solution pathways. Here are four of these GRE memorization techniques that our clients are taught.

1. Memorize the answer layout.

Some question types have the same responses. On the GRE, answers to the Data Completion Questions are presented in the same way. These being: 

  1. Quantity A is greater.
  2. Quantity B is greater.
  3. The two quantities are equal.
  4. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

As a test prepper, you can memorize these statements, given they remain the same throughout the entire GRE. We suggest memorizing a more simple form of these answer types. For example: 

  1. A is bigger
  2. B is bigger
  3. Both are equal
  4. Cannot know 

By using this as a memorization technique it will cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answer types each time you come in contact with them. 

2. Practice the vocabulary in everyday life.

Specialists argue that people can easily improve their English language skills if they broaden the size of their vocabulary by transferring words from their passive to active vocabulary. When a person knows what a certain word means but doesn’t ever use it in everyday life, this word is in their passive vocabulary. Once this word gets used when speaking or writing, it can be easily recalled from memory whenever it is needed. In this way, people can learn to use the word in a sentence while also considering the appropriate context and suitable collocations. This can be an immense benefit when preparing for the GRE, as the vocabulary section on the exam is quite challenging.

What many people do and what we would also suggest is using flashcards for memorizing the words and engraining them in your memory. Then commit to using a handful of them during the week. You can also keep a notebook with the most difficult terms, their dictionary definitions, and examples to revert back to them as your vocabulary grows.

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics.

If you are a couple of years out of school or if you are just having a hard time remembering mathematical concepts and formulas, the Quantitative portion on the GRE can seem like a daunting task. We understand this, which is why we avoid using math on the GRE all together! But sometimes, the best path is the most direct. Remember some basic math equations and formulas using the following tricks: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty! 
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction

4. Apply a visual meaning to things.

It is a common fact that people’s brains process visual stimulation much faster than textual information. That is why some people who have superior visual memory can recall visual information easily. Their brains have established relations between visual objects and data. This type of memory is very important when it comes to many academic tasks including doing reading comprehension exercises and mathematical operations. Naturally, it can be used on the GRE as well. So, if you are one of these people, or if you have never consciously used your visual memory to your advantage, this is your sign to try.

While studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. For example, when you are working on a particular math problem, stare at the radiator in your room. Then, during the exam (if you are taking the GRE online), look at the radiator once you come in contact with a similar problem. This trick will help your brain in remembering what you learned beforehand. If you are taking the GRE onsite, consider pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps fiddle with a ring on your finger while memorizing words, or wear a favorite sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices.

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often.

Reading information out of a textbook and taking notes is the approach most people have when learning. Although this may seem useful, people seem to forget most of the information they read about. For this reason, applying what you just read about in real life can be very useful. One way to do this is to practice doing questions in different locations – at a restaurant, while riding into work, while cooking dinner, etc. This will challenge your brain to think strategically in various situations and prepare it for the dynamic environment of the testing facility. You can do this both with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam. Plus it would look extra cool if you are seen jotting math equations down on a napkin while waiting for your food at a restaurant. 

These GRE memorization techniques may seem straightforward, but they require work. However, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, and thus the job you receive after graduating. While you are not your GRE, your test score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra help in preparing for the GRE, we offer extensive one-on-one tutoring with high-achieving clients. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips
Posted on
25
Mar 2022

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section can be a tough nut to crack. But never fear! We’ve compiled some top tips to help you ace this section of the test. So whether you’re a math whiz or just looking to brush up on your quantitative skills, read on for everything you need to know to score high on the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section.

What does the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section test? 

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to use basic math concepts and solve problems under time pressure. While the quantitative reasoning section does assess some high-level math, it focuses primarily on real-world problem-solving skills.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Question Categories 

The math you learned in high school is mostly what’s on the GRE. The majority of GRE math questions won’t require tons of number-crunching if you know how to approach them, but they will test your critical thinking and problem solving abilities. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions will generally fall into one of four major categories: 

1. Arithmetic

The arithmetic category covers basic math concepts such as integers, fractions, and decimals. It also includes the concepts of ratio, absolute value, and sequences of numbers. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in the arithmetic category may also ask you to calculate percentages or solve word problems.  

2. Algebra

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions that fall into this category may test your ability to solve equations or inequalities. Questions in this area often require you to know the properties of basic algebraic functions (for example, solving linear and quadratic equations, equations and inequalities, factoring) as well as their graphs. 

3. Geometry

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may test your knowledge of angles, triangles 30°-60°-90°, three-dimensional figures, or coordinate geometry. Questions in geometry often ask you to calculate the area of a shape or determine the distance between two points on a plane. 

4. Data analysis

In this part, you will be asked to interpret data from graphs such as bar and circle charts, box plots, scatter plots. This includes finding the mean, median, mode, range, standard deviations, interquartile range, quartiles, and might include probability questions as well. 

An example might be two six-sided dice, each side has a number between 1 and 6. What is the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown?

There are 36 possible outcomes when two dice are thrown. Out of those, six outcomes will result in a sum of 7. This means that the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown is 6/36 or 1/6.

Format

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section is composed of two 35-minute sections. In both sections you can expect:

  • Quantitative Comparison questions

    These questions always include a column of numbers and a column labeled “A” or “B”. Your task is to compare the two columns. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may also ask you to identify which number is larger, which number lies between two other numbers, or which of two expressions is an integer.

  • Problem Solving questions

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category will test your ability to solve problems. You will be asked to determine the solution set of an equation or graph, interpret data, or solve a problem based on real-world scenarios.

  • Data Interpretation

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may ask you to interpret data presented in a table, graph, or text passage. You may also be asked to determine the relationship between variables or predict future outcomes based on trends.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Types of Questions

1. Quantitative Comparison questions

You will be given 4-option-multiple-choice questions. You will need to use your skills to determine the relationship between quantities.

Example:

Quantity A
The least prime number greater than 24

Quantity B
The greatest prime number less than 28

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given. 

Answer: For the integers greater than 24, note that 25, 26, 27, and 28 are not prime numbers, but 29 is a prime number, as are 31 and many other greater integers. Thus, 29 is the least prime number greater than 24, and Quantity A is 29. For the integers less than 28, note that 27, 26, 25, and 24 are not prime numbers, but 23 is a prime number, as are 19 and several other lesser integers. Thus, 23 is the greatest prime number less than 28, and Quantity B is a prime number less than 28. The correct answer is Choice A, Quantity A is greater.

2. Multiple-choice questions (One Answer Choice)

These are questions that have five possible answers. You need to choose the correct answer from among these choices.

Example: A certain jar contains 60 jelly beans — 22 white, 18 green, 11 yellow, 5 red, and 4 purple. If a jelly bean is to be chosen at random, what is the probability that the jelly bean will be neither red nor purple?

A. 0.09
B. 0.15
C. 0.54
D. 0.85
E. 0.91

Answer: There are 5 red and 4 purple jelly beans in the jar. That means there are 51 jelly beans that are neither red nor purple. The probability of selecting one of these is 51/60, or 0.85. The correct answer is D

3. Multi-select questions (One or More Answer Choices)

In this category you are allowed to select more than one answer choice. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in this category usually begin with a series of answer choices and present data in a table, graph, or text passage.

Example: Which of the following integers are multiples of both 2 and 3?Indicate all such integers.

A. 8
B. 9
C. 12
D. 18
E. 21
F. 36

Answer: There are a few different ways to figure out the answer. You can find the multiples of 2, which are 8, 12, 18, and 36. Then you can look for the multiples of 3, which are 12, 18, and 36. Another way to do it is if you know that every number that is a multiple of 2 and 3 is also a multiple of 6. So then you would just pick the choices that are multiples of 6. The answer is C (12), D (18), and F (36).

4. Numeric Entry Questions

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category allow you to type your own answers into empty boxes. This means that you won’t be given answers to choose from. 

Example: One pen costs $0.25 and one marker costs $0.35. At those prices, what is the total cost of 18 pens and 100 markers?

Answer: $0.25 multiplied by 18 equals $4.50. This is the cost of the 18 pens.

$0.35 multiplied by 100 equals $35.00, which is the cost of the 100 markers. The total cost is therefore 4.50 + 35.00 = $39.50. Equivalent decimals, such as $39.5 or $39.500  (or any equivalent), are considered correct answers.

Remember to only use the decimal point and negative sign when entering the numbers in the answer box. No need to add the dollar sign since it’s already added in the answer box.

Tips to Ace The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section

1. Plug in numbers

It can be very helpful to plug in numbers when you’re in doubt of the correct answer. ETS GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills but rather how well you can solve problems.

2. Memorize the answer choices 

In Quantitative Comparison questions the answers are always in the following order:

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

You should be able to answer questions within 2 minutes and, therefore, this will save you time.

3. Make sure the answer is in the correct format

In the Numeric Entry questions, you will have to fill in an empty box. Therefore, you need to make sure that you are writing your answer in the correct format. Keep an eye on questions that might ask you to round the answer. 

4. Pay extra attention to words

Make sure to spot words such as “between”, “except”, “not”, “approximately”, “about”. Make sure that you don’t round down or up. You don’t want to lose points because you misread the question when you actually knew the correct answer. 

5. Process of elimination

The strategy of eliminating wrong answers can be your best friend. If you’re having trouble with GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions, you can always use the process of elimination to help you narrow your choices.

6. Do practice questions

Practicing will help you to become familiar with the examination pattern. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section contains many similar questions with slight variations on the same concept. Practicing will help you be more relaxed and confident on the day of the exam. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning tests your understanding and not just your ability to remember formulas or mathematical concepts. 

Keep in mind that on the exam day, you can use a basic calculator. So make sure you are using a simple calculator while practicing because you won’t have extra features on the exam.

GRE Private tutoring

If you are not comfortable with GRE Quantitative Reasoning, if you find it difficult, or if you are not confident with your math skills, you can always sign up for private GRE tutoring. Apex private GRE tutors focus on your needs and personal strengths, tailoring personalized GRE lessons to best help you achieve your goals.

Remember, the GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills, but rather how well you can solve problems. The best way to do well on this exam is to familiarize yourself with the types of questions by practicing. We hope these insights have been helpful so far, but if not, feel free to reach out anytime with more specific inquiries.

 

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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Successful GRE
Posted on
24
Feb 2021

5 Takeaways from a Successful GRE Journey

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Svetozara Saykova
Date: February 24, 2021

Each client that contacts us is in a different stage of their GRE prep, but a universal constant is that each is striving for a great 328+ GRE score. The threshold difficulty standing in their way is the lack of a proper mindset, which in turn can lead to a poor performance, whether due attitude, inefficient solving mechanisms, misplaced focus, or myriad other issues. No matter what, mindset leads the way to performance.

To adjust one’s way of perceiving problems requires much more intricate work than cramming a bunch of material, facts, and figures. Taking the time to understand this and elevate your approach to the test is challenging but ultimately rewarding come test day. Here are five takeaways that anyone scoring 328 or better on the GRE comes to realize along their GRE journey. These insights that help test takers thrive help top performers continue to excel in their grad school programs and in their post-graduate school careers, long after the GRE is a distant memory.

It is not what you know… it’s what you do with it

The GRE is a psychometric exam. It expects you to be knowledgeable in a core group of secondary school concepts. It’s not a knowledge test, but it uses this universe of information as a baseline that everyone reasonably has been exposed to long before they thought about the GRE. The exam tests not so much your knowledge but your creative application of that knowledge.

In the process of preparing for your GRE it is vital to maximize your performance, which necessitates deep understanding of seemingly straightforward concepts so that you can be flexible in how you navigate them. For instance, in the Integrated Reasoning section there is a high chance that you will come across an unfamiliar graph you need to use. In such a case the ability to draw conclusions from known graphs and apply them to the new situation is much more valuable than having seen the specific graph before.

This holds true well beyond the exam. The amount of information you will be exposed to within the 2 years of a top tier graduate school program is staggering. In order to thrive in this demanding environment you must be selective, actively deciding what information you take on to master, and use universal thinking tools (heuristics and mental models) to be adaptable as new concepts and information come your way.

For the GRE, the core concepts are indeed essential. But it is also important to notice what concepts and information you can derive from fundamental knowledge and how to do so, hence not needing to memorize it. Knowing how to successfully apply your knowledge will result in efficiency which will afford you the ability and time to excel in the GRE, explore what your graduate program has to offer, and be a thought leader in your chosen career.

Prioritization is crucial 

On the GRE there are harsh penalties for unanswered questions, so it is vital to complete each section in the time allotted. Therefore, proper time and process management are critical when sitting the exam. Essentially, each problem represents a decision where you must weigh the likelihood of obtaining a correct answer, your time commitment to that problem, ancillary considerations like stress and focus management, and how this problem fits into your larger strategy for the section and the exam. Ultimately, you must decide how much time it is worth expending on each problem as part of your core process.

This mental cost-benefit analysis must be deeply embedded in your thought process to achieve an elite GRE score. With the proper calibration, this sense will certainly be useful in graduate school and beyond. In the professional world, there will always be time constraints – be it stringent deadlines or time zone differences. Being able to prioritize focus and make decisions quickly and accurately while navigating uncertainty and incomplete information is a huge strength. Similarly, actively choosing to abandon a low value or less important task so that you can fully devote to solving an issue of importance is not a sign of weakness or incapability, but rather an asset in a world that will always ask more of you than you can give. Time is scarce in the workplace, and just like on the GRE, you should prioritize what adds the most value to your bottom line.

Every problem has multiple solution paths

A common theme in our client’s feedback is their fascination with a core principle that we teach; that every GRE problem has multiple solution paths and that sensitivity to how you solve the problem is more important than simply arriving at the correct answer. Let’s take a means and averages problem from the Quant section as an example. Many would be tempted to solve this mathematically straightaway, but this problem can be solved more efficiently using a scenario or a graph rather than processing equations, delivering greater clarity and freeing up valuable time for other, more challenging problems.

Wresting yourself away from the paradigm that a problem has a single “correct” solution path is essential to conquering the GRE but is also valuable in life. Very few things are clear cut and unambiguous, and training yourself to recognize multiple ways to get to the same destination is important, especially if you can recognize them before committing to any specific path. Seeking answers beyond the ordinary and obvious will provide you with innovative ways of overcoming obstacles and drive progress, and make you a thought leader among your peers and in your graduate program and organization.

Focusing on the structure of the GRE helps you compare solution paths and choose the best for the current challenge, resulting in not only a correct answer, but a timely one. Moreover, thinking of a problem from multiple perspectives means that you take into consideration unlikely or unnoticed features of a problem, and when applied to a professional setting, this added vision can drive great insight into stakeholders interests and uncover innovative solutions to intractable problems.

In order to succeed first know yourself

The GRE is not an exam where you can get 100% of the problems correct. In fact, your score will not depend on the number of questions that you get correct, but rather by the difficulty level of the ones that you do get correct. Since the GRE is computer-adaptive, it increases in difficulty until it matches a candidate’s capabilities, and the aim as a test taker is to get to the most difficult problems that you can handle, and then get most of those correct. In this way, the GRE drives you to perform at your best rather than spending a lot of time testing fundamentals.

Ultimately, this means that you must decide how to allocate your time and energy to produce the best performance. This means understanding your strengths and weaknesses, evaluating each problem in light of those, and then deciding which problems make sense to handle, which make sense to invest extra time in, and which (few) problems you might want to walk away from right off the bat in order to preserve your valuable time for higher value problems. Don’t simply put your head down and try to get everything right – at least not at first.

During your GRE preparation you should be conscious of how you perform and how you have progressed from where you began. If you struggle to finish a practice exam in a timely manner, this is a sign that your time management skills require polishing, and that you’re not making timing decisions well. If you perform well on Sentence Equivalence but not on the Reading Comprehension, then that means that you can spend less time on SE questions and reallocate that time towards Reading Comp, thereby increasing your score and building confidence in your GRE allocation decisions along the way.

Understanding your strengths and weaknesses, and the workload you handle best will help you excel in your career. Furthermore, knowing your capabilities can aid you when setting work boundaries and defining your professional skill set on the other side of graduate school. Successful professionals know how to focus on what they do best, and remove those tasks that impinge upon their productivity and value.

In this way, they don’t find themselves taking on too much, and are able to have work-life balance, all while placing them in a position to continue to achieve because of that balance. Overworking is counterproductive because it drives burnout and reduces focus and efficiency. In much the same way that athletes require proper rest for peak performance, those working in intellectually rigorous fields requiring creativity need mental breaks for better focus, clarity and job performance. In this sense, being aware of your own limitations will guide you towards a healthy work-life balance and in turn increase productivity.

5% talent and 95% hard work

Being naturally intuitive with numbers or extremely well-read can provide a great footing for your GRE preparation. Without further development, however, natural talent can only take you so far. The GRE begins testing you the moment you can no longer trust your intuition and talent, and then need to rely upon knowing what you don’t know, and navigating towards deeper insights. The GRE tests a range of skills such as critical assessment of data, ability to reason and analytical thinking. This means that being knowledgeable and skilful with fundamentals, or being a strong student only lays the foundation for success. It’s persistence, determination, and having a comprehensive study plan and clear understanding of GRE architecture that defines those who score a 328 or better.

The good news is that the skills necessary to get a 328+ GRE score can be cultivated and enhanced with hard work, perseverance and determination. Moreover, these same skills can help you get the most out of your graduate program and career and enhance your skill set. For example, in graduate school you may come across an exceptional mathematician pursuing a concentration in  economics because she has identified a weak point, and wants to focus on how to conduct research, to write and communicate clearly and effectively and to understand and implement data in the decision making process. Similarly, someone with average mathematical Mathematical ability might excel in Finance courses because of the skills he has developed – analytical thinking, problem solving, and constructing mental models.

Conclusion

The most important thing is to put in the hard work (effortful learning, not just a lot of prep time) to grow those top-level skills, regardless of how naturally gifted you are in a given subject. Graduate programs aren’t all creativity or math, and in this way professional challenges are similar to the GRE itself, which is neither about Math nor English grammar. Compensating your weaknesses and enhancing your strengths in your chosen concentration will be a vital part of your graduate school experience, and it should start with your GRE preparation.

Your GRE journey can be pleasant and enriching rather than an arduous, distasteful experience that you dread having to go through. With the proper mindset, guidance and support you can grow through your GRE experience to acquire valuable skills that will help you for years to come.

Schedule a call with one of our experienced GRE consultants  and get a head start on the road to achieving your goals!

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Private Tutoring GRE
Posted on
24
Feb 2021

How Can Private Tutoring Help You Score 328+ on the GRE?

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Irena Georgieva
Date: February 24, 2021

Achieving a 328+ score on the GRE is not a simple task – it requires significant preparation, excellent organization, and continuous motivation to learn. Studying for an exam can be overwhelming, especially when there is no one by your side to keep you motivated. Perhaps you’re struggling with quant problems or you’re not sure how to apply the strategies that you have learned. Well, don’t worry… This is where private GRE tutoring comes into play.

Here are the top 5 reasons you should start working with a tutor in order to ace the GRE.

Index:

1.     Individualized Learning Experience

Although the GRE is a standardized exam, there is no “one size fits all” approach to success. While some students favor graphical solution paths, others are more analytical or methodical in their approach to answering GRE questions. Some struggle with geometry, others with algebra, yet others with critical reasoning. There are learners who have excellent writing skills, while others, particularly ESL students, require practice to achieve a good score on the analytical writing assessment. The existence of these differences indicates that there is not only a singular path to studying for such a nuanced exam and that preparation should be customized to maximize one’s strengths and abilities.

Unlike classroom teaching where the teacher rarely deviates from the prescribed syllabus, a competent private tutor will tailor your learning plan based on the knowledge and skills you currently possess and their expertise. By identifying your learning style and framing your entire prep program around it, a skilled GRE tutor will ensure that you are not only progressing through your prep but enjoying it as well.

What’s more, a perceptive private GRE tutor will also focus your attention on the areas where you experience difficulties or need improvement, especially those areas that you can’t see for yourself. Due to this guidance and direction, you will be able to spend more time on improving, and less time repeating the same mistakes or going over content that you’ve already mastered. You’ll develop new skills that were previously lacking and adopt more favorable methods to solve difficult problems. Additionally, you will learn how to organize your time more effectively which is essential for you on the exam.

2.     Personalized Attention

Although classroom teaching can prove beneficial for mastering the fundamental knowledge needed for higher-level approaches, one disadvantage of learning with others is the lack of personalized attention and focus on the lowest common denominator type construal of the concepts being taught. Teachers in any classroom cannot pay attention to all of their students’ needs, especially those who struggle differently than most, or who have higher goals than their classmates. While one student might be struggling with the clustering principle that defines standard deviation as it applies to comparing different sets, another might require a refresh on calculating variance and how the underlying concept operates. Whatever your specific case may be, the help of a private tutor can address it.

By working with a top-notch tutor outside of the classroom, you’ll be able to rapidly progress and draw on personalized mental models to confidently approach GRE problems of the highest complexity. A skilled GRE tutor will not only help you acquire new knowledge but s/he is also going to teach you valuable meta-strategies that can be useful for you when you study for the exam. At Apex we focus on solution paths, problem forming, and many other innovative techniques that make for high-yield self-preparation, and top-level scores.

Moreover, a highly qualified private tutor will have a team behind him/her and copious amounts of materials and drills, while drawing upon a flexible curriculum so that your preparation can be as personalized and efficient as possible and result in the score you are striving to achieve. You shouldn’t be afraid to speak openly with your GRE tutor about any concerns you have regarding your preparation, and your tutor should always be open to your feedback and input, rather than trying to “run the show”. Recall that the purpose of engaging a tutor is not only the acquisition of knowledge but also the attention and support you will be given.

3.     Improved Confidence

Working with a proficient private tutor will definitely boost your confidence, and confidence is essential to exemplary GRE performance. After a few sessions, you should expect to see how much your tutor has helped you learn and adopt fresh skills and additional perspective – about the GRE and about yourself as a test taker  – and address the problems you thought impossible just a few short weeks prior. Almost imperceptibly you will become more proficient in your execution and more sensitive to the different ways the GRE modulates complexity and delivers hints about the most viable and efficient solution paths (here at Apex we call these “Test Reads”). Thorough preparation will marginalize your fear of failure and help you combat latent (or not so latent) test anxiety so that you can manifest the high expectations that you’ve likely set at the outset of this process.

In addition, a capable private tutor will ensure that you address your anxiety about the exam in a healthy way. Aside from designing a study plan customized to your learning style, your GRE tutor will focus on other salient, but less popular factors that affect GRE performance; the amount of sleep you get, and overstudying, to name just two. While you might not have considered these factors, or believe them to be unimportant, they drastically influence productivity and affect test day performance. That is why an experienced GRE tutor will do everything s/he can to make you ready, and make you feel ready, for your exam.

4.     Greater Motivation

Constant preparation can be exhausting and without the proper support and encouragement, it’s normal to lose your motivation along the way. A tutor, however, can provide that motivation and understanding of what you’re going through – something well-meaning friends and family cannot – so that your goals become reality.

Apart from ensuring your efficient preparation for the GRE, a personal GRE tutor will also be your greatest mentor, motivator, and cheerleader. S/he will be the person who will check in, see how you’re doing midweek, and encourage you the most because he/she will be personally invested in you and will have a professional stake in the outcome of your preparation. The best tutors take their clients’ successes personally, and this informs their attentiveness and personal pride. The faith that your tutor has in you should inspire you so that you can achieve your dream score and satisfy your collective expectations. Thus, you will be even more motivated than before and you will perceive the exam as an opportunity to demonstrate all the novel skills you have developed and trained throughout your preparation.

5.     Higher GRE Score

Last, but certainly not least, preparation with the help of a private tutor will result in a higher score on test day when compared to classroom learning or self-preparation alone or in combination. As we have already mentioned, lessons from a devoted private tutor will provide you with an individualized learning experience and more personalized attention which will lead to an increase in your confidence and motivation for the exam. Finally, you will learn more than just GRE strategies from your tutor. You will learn critical and creative thinking skills, heuristics, mental models, and other thinking tools that will help you make the most of all future learning opportunities. The best tutors, like the ones here at Apex, teach you how to better learn, and become mentors and trusted advisors as you progress through your graduate school and further career.

Final Notes 

To sum things up: private GRE tutoring can be expensive but the value it will deliver will be more than worth the money. The best tutoring stays with you and will add color and perspective to your future learning, whether in your graduate program, on the job, or as you progress through your career. If you want to embark on your GRE journey with a private tutor, make sure you:

  • speak to several instructors at first. Apex offers a complimentary consultation call and you can schedule one HERE
  • hear the opinions of others who have already tried private GRE tutoring HERE.

Thanks for reading this article and good luck with your GRE preparation!

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