GRE Quantitative Reasoning: A Glossary of Math Terms
Posted on
23
Nov 2022

GRE Quantitative Reasoning: A Glossary of Math Terms

Have you begun studying for the GRE quantitative reasoning sections? Are you being held up by the recurring appearance of math terms whose definitions you don’t fully understand? We are here to help! Read through our glossary of math terms to know for GRE quantitative reasoning.

If you really need help learning these terms, consider turning them into a flashcard deck. (We would provide you with one of these, too, but the act of making your own flashcards is half the benefit.) And if you really need help getting ready for the GRE quantitative reasoning sections, sign up for a free consultation call with one of our expert instructors.

GRE Geometry Terms

Acute angle – an angle of less than 90 degrees

Area – a measure of the two-dimensional space enclosed by a circle or polygon

Bisect – to divide into two equal lengths or areas

Complementary – of two angles with a sum of 90 degrees

Congruent – having the same shape and size (for polygons, sides, or angles)

Coordinate plane – the two-dimensional grid network formed by the X and Y axes

Cube – a regular rectangular prism (each of the six sides is a square)

Cylinder – a prism with circular ends

Equidistant – of two points, being the same distance from another point or line

Interior angle – an angle inside a polygon formed by two sides meeting at a vertex

Intersect(ion) – of two lines, to meet and cross, or the point at which two lines meet and cross

Obtuse angle – and angle more than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees

Parallel – lines, segments, or sides that run exactly the same direction

Perimeter – the distance around a polygon, the sum of the lengths of its sides

Perpendicular –  lines, segments, or sides that meet or would meet at a 90-degree angle

Polygon – an enclosed shape of line segments (sides) meeting at angles

Prism – a solid made by adding height/depth to a circle or polygon

Regular – of a polygon, having sides of equal length and angles of equal measure

Rectangular prism – a box of six rectangular sides

Reflex angle – an angle greater than 180 degrees and less than 360 degrees

Right angle – a 90-degree angle

Similar – having the same shape but not necessarily the same size (for polygons)

Slope – the “steepness” of a line, its ratio of upward “motion” to rightward “motion”

Solid – a three-dimensional shape

Supplementary – of two angles with a sum of 180 degrees

Vertex – a point on a polygon where two sides meet

Volume – a measure of the three-dimensional space enclosed by or taken up by a solid

X-axis – the horizontal axis of the coordinate plane

X-intercept – a point at which a line or graph crosses the x-axis

Y-axis– the vertical axis of the coordinate plane

Y-intercept – a point at which a line or graph crosses the y-axis

Circles

Arc – a segment of a circle’s circumference

Central angle – an angle formed between a circle’s center and two points on its edge

Circumference – the distance around a circle

Diameter – the longest distance across a circle (through the center)

Radius –  the distance from a circle’s center to its edge

Sector – a “pie slice” of a circle created by a central angle

Quadrilaterals

Parallelogram – opposite sides parallel and of equal length

Rectangle – angles each 90 degrees, opposite sides of equal length

Square – angles each 90 degrees, sides of equal length

Trapezoid – one set of parallel sides

Triangles

30-60-90 – a right triangle with angle measures of 30, 60, and 90 degrees

45-45-90 – a right isosceles triangle (with angle measures of 45, 45, and 90 degrees)

Base – the length of a side perpendicular to a height

Equilateral – all sides are the same length

Height – the measure of perpendicular distance from a side designated as a base to the vertex opposite

Hypotenuse – the longest side of a right triangle, across from the 90-degree angle

Isosceles – two sides are the same length, and the third side is a different length

Legs – the two shorter sides of a right triangle, meeting at the 90-degree angle

Right – one angle is 90 degrees

Scalene – no sides are the same length

GRE Arithmetic/Algebra Terms

Absolute value – a value’s distance from zero (always positive)

Base – a value or variable being raised to a power by a notated exponent

Coefficient – in an expression or equation, a value in multiplication with a variable

Constant – in an expression or equation, a value not in multiplication or division with any variable

Denominator – the lower part of a fraction

Equation – a mathematical “statement” of the equivalent value of two expressions

Exponent – a superscripted value or variable indicating the power to which a given base is to be raised

Expression – mathematical notation of operations to be performed between values and variables

Index – a value or variable used in conjunction with a radical to indicate the root to be taken from a given value or variable

Inequality – a mathematical “statement” of the comparative values of two or more expressions

Numerator – the upper part of a fraction

Power – a number of times for a given value to be multiplied by itself

Radical – a symbol used to indicate a specified root of a given value or variable

Reciprocal – the “flip” of a fraction, or the fraction resulting when a value or variable is made the denominator of a fraction with a numerator of 1

Root – a value that, when raised to a specified power, equals a given value

Units digit – the digit in the “ones place,” the digit immediately to the left of the decimal

Variable – an “unknown” or “replaceable” value, represented by an italicized English or, sometimes, Greek letter

GRE Number Properties Terms

Arithmetic sequence – a sequence of values differing from one to the next by the same amount, equidistant on a number line (6, 8, 10, 12, 14) (27, 35, 43, 51, 59)

Divisible – able to be divided evenly into a given number of groups or pieces

Divisor – in integer by which a given integer is divisible (interchangeable with factor)

Even – an integer divisible by 2 (a multiple of 2, but 0 is also even)

Factor – an integer that, when multiplied by some integer, produces a given value (interchangeable with divisor)

Geometric sequence – a series of values changing by the same factor from one to the next (5, 15, 45, 135, 405) (8, 32, 128, 512, 2048)

Greatest common factor – the largest integer that is a factor of each integer in a given set

Integer – a whole number (whether positive, negative or 0)

Multiple – an integer that is divisible by a given integer (15, 84, and 321 are multiples of 3)

Least common multiple – the smallest integer that is a multiple of each integer in a given set

Odd – an integer nor divisible by 2 (not a multiple of 2)

Prime number – a number with no factors besides 1 and itself

Remainder – the number left over or left out when an integer does not divide evenly into a given number of groups (17 / 5 has remainder 2 because if 17 things are split into 5 equal groups (of 3), 2 things will be left over)

GRE Statistics Terms

Mean – the value that results from dividing the sum of the values in a data set by the number of values in the set (sometimes “arithmetic mean”)

Median – the “middle value” in a data set, or, in the case of an even number of values, the mean of the two middle values (1, 1, 2, 3, 5 has median 2;   1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21 has median 4)

Mode – the value with the most instances or occurrences in a data set

Percentile – a measure of the percentage of values in a data set that are equal to or less than a given value (in a data set comprising the integers from 1 through 100, inclusive, 34 is at the 34th percentile, 79 is at the 79th percentile)

Quartiles – the values at the 25th, 50th, 75, and 100th percentiles: Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4, respectively (in a data set comprising the integers from 1 through 100, inclusive, Q1 is 25, Q2 is 50, Q3 is 75, and Q4 is 100)

Range – the difference between the highest and lowest values in a data set

Standard deviation – the average (positive) amount by which a value in a data set differs from the mean of the set.

If you are interested in speaking with one of our GRE private tutors, you can sign-up for a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call. You can also learn more from our past clients who were able to achieve their cumulative 325+ score with us!

Contributor: Elijah Mize (Apex GRE Instructor)

Read more
Posted on
09
Nov 2022

GRE Structure, Scoring, and Strategy Tips

If you are at the beginning of your GRE prep journey, it’s important to understand the structure of the test and to be equipped with the right strategies for navigating each section. In this article, we’ll overview the delivery structure of the exam and provide powerful GRE tips to help you earn your best possible score on test day.

GRE Structure and Scoring

The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) comprises six sections.

Analytical Writing

The first section, the Analytical Writing measure, has two tasks timed at thirty minutes each. The first task asks you to “analyze and issue” by taking a position on a brief statement. For this task, you will have to construct your own argument in support of your position. The second task asks you to “analyze an argument,” providing you with a short paragraph in which an author supports their own position on an issue. For this task, you will not construct your own argument but critique the argument in the prompt, identifying the assumptions and facts upon which it relies for strength and validity.

Each writing task will be scored on a range from 0 to 6 in half-point increments, both by a person and by a program, with the two scores being averaged. If the scores given by the person and by the program are significantly different, another person will take the place of the program, and the two human-generated scores will be averaged. (This person/program scoring approach is the same as on the GMAT). Once each of the two tasks has its averaged score, those two scores are in turn averaged into your final Analytical Writing score.

Quantitative Reasoning and Verbal Reasoning

Sections two through six are the Quantitative Reasoning and Verbal Reasoning measures. Each section has twenty questions, but the Quant sections are timed at thirty-five minutes each, while the Verbal sections are timed at just thirty minutes each.

While ETS (Educational Testing Service, the administrators of the GRE) maintains that the sections can appear in any order, the official practice tests on their website and the experience of thousands of test-takers indicate that these sections will always alternate types (Q-V-Q-V-Q or V-Q-V-Q-V). Only two sections of each type (two Quant and two Verbal) count towards your score.

For whichever type has three sections, one of those sections is experimental and unscored. This section exists for ETS to check the validity of new content for future administrations of the GRE. There is no safe way to recognize or distinguish the experimental section from its scored counterparts; you need to treat every section as if it counts.

Like the GMAT, the GRE is adaptive, but on a much lower-resolution scale. While the GMAT adapts on a question-by-question basis, the GRE only adapts the difficulty of the second (scored) section of each type (Quant and Verbal) based on your performance on the first (scored) section of that type, which is always of medium difficulty. ETS has not released information on how many different degrees of difficulty exist for the second sections, but the official practice tests provided on the ETS website have three possibilities for each second section: an easier one, a medium one, and a harder one.

Both the Quantitative Reasoning and Verbal Reasoning measures are scored on a scale from 130 to 170. Unlike the GMAT, the GRE does not combine the Quant and Verbal scores into some overall score or report percentiles for test-takers’ combined scores out of 340 (the sum of the scores for the Quant and Verbal sections). Percentiles are only provided for the independent Quant and Verbal scores out of 170, as well as for the Analytical Writing measure.

GRE scoring percentiles:

Here are up-to-date GRE scoring percentiles:

GRE Score Percentiles for Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning

Scaled Score Verbal Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning
170 99 96
169 99 93
168 98 90
167 98 87
166 97 84
165 95 81
164 94 78
163 92 76
162 90 73
161 87 70
160 85 67
159 81 64
158 78 61
157 74 57
156 66 54
155 67 51
154 58 47
153 58 43
152 52 40
151 48 37
150 43 33
149 38 30
148 34 27
147 30 23
146 27 20
145 24 17

GRE Score Percentiles for Analytical Writing

Score Percentile Rank
6.0 99
5.5 97
5.0 91
4.5 79
4.0 54
3.5 37
3.0 13
2.5 6
2.0 2
1.5 1
1.0
0.5
0.0

GRE Strategy Tips

A main structural difference between the GMAT and the GRE is the GRE’s feature of section navigation. While the GMAT does not allow test-takers to navigate a section or return to any previously-encountered questions on the section, the GRE has a navigation screen for each Quant and Verbal section, accessible via a “review” button in the top-right corner of the test.

This screen shows you the status of each question in the section. If you haven’t seen a question yet, it will be labeled “not encountered.” If you have seen a question but not answered it, it will be labeled “not answered.” As you can see on question 4 of this section (highlighted above), a question may also be labeled “incomplete” if it has multiple parts and only some of these parts are completed (this is possible on most of the vocabulary-based questions on Verbal sections).

You should never actually leave a question “incomplete” or altogether “unanswered” before moving on, even if you mark it for review. When you toggle the “mark” button (right next to the “review” button in the top right), always fully answer the question before moving on. Even a random answer is better than no answer at all.

[Note: the label “Section 2 of 5” indicates a total of five sections rather than six because the practice tests do not include an experimental section. Also, you can toggle between showing and hiding the time remaining for the section. This feature is on the real GRE as well.]

The navigation feature represents an exploitable opportunity for GRE-takers. Since both the Quant and Verbal sections have consistent internal structures, you can choose which questions to work through first and which questions to leave until the end. For more info on these “internal structures,” stay tuned for upcoming articles.

On the Verbal sections, you can choose whether to do reading comprehension questions or vocabulary questions first. In the Quant sections, you can begin with all the quantitative comparison questions or leave them until the end. You can also specifically target the data interpretation questions early on if that suits you.

Some test-takers will benefit from getting their least favorite questions out of the way and then speeding through the easy stuff. Other test-takers might like to knock out the easy questions first in order to know exactly how much time they’ll have to complete the harder ones. You can figure out what’s best for you personally on your way through the GRE prep process, and the insights of a private GRE tutor can be of great value here.

Thanks for reading our GRE tips regarding structure, scoring, and strategy. As this series of articles continues, we’ll break down the Quant and Verbal sections independently to help you understand the structure and content of each section type.

If you are interested in speaking with one of our GRE tutors, you can sign-up for a complimentary, 30-minute, consultation call. You can also learn more from our past clients who were able to achieve their cumulative 325+ score with us!

Contributor: Elijah Mize (Apex GRE Instructor)

Read more
Taking the GRE in New York: Everything You Need to Know
Posted on
26
Oct 2022

Taking the GRE in New York: Everything You Need to Know

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GRE prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GRE in New York.

Who administers the GRE in New York?

The GRE is administered by Prometric. They have many test centers located throughout New York, so you should have no problem finding a convenient location.

What does the test center look like in New York?

The GRE is a computer-based test, so you will be taking the test on a computer. The test center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each taker.

Where are the test centers located in new york?

Center 1:

1250 Broadway, #2500

New York, NY 10001

+1 646-690-0303

Directions to the test center

Center 2:

80 Broad St #3400

New York, NY 10004

+1 212-785-0359

Directions to the test center

Center 3:

384 Bridge St

Brooklyn, NY 11201

+1 718-797-4061

Directions to the test center

Top MBA programs in new york

There are many top MBA programs in New York. Some of the most popular programs include: 

Tips

Here are some tips to help you prepare for the GRE: 

  • Get started early – give yourself time to prepare and increase your chances of success.
  • Create a study plan and stick to it for the most effective preparation.
  • Familiarize yourself with the GRE format.
  • Hire a personal GRE tutor who will guide you through the exam. You will get one-on-one attention and they can help guide your studies according to what’s needed for success.

GRE test Day FAQs

Here are some answers to common questions about taking the GRE

How long is the GRE?

The GRE is a 3-hour 45-minute computer adaptive test that has three sections: an analytical writing assessment, a quantitative section, and a verbal one.

Am I allowed to bring a calculator?

You will not be able to bring your personal calculator to the GRE exam. You should also leave any unnecessary electronic devices at home.

If you are looking for professional help to boost your GRE performance, head to our official website and book your 30 minutes complimentary assessment session now.

Read more
GRE Test Dates 2022-2023
Posted on
12
Oct 2022

GRE Test Dates 2022-2023

If you’re thinking about taking the GRE, it’s important to know when the test is offered. The GRE is offered throughout the year, so there are plenty of test dates to choose from. 

GRE Test Dates: How often is the GRE offered?

The GRE has two testing options – at home or in a test center.

if you decide to take the GRE at home, 24/7 with testing dates available around the clock.

Things to consider:

  • The GRE at-home test option is not available in China and Iran.
  • You can take the GRE every 21 days if you need to. If you’re not happy with your GRE score, you can always retake the test.
  • The GRE at-home exam is identical to an exam that you would sit for at a testing center.

if you decide to take the GRE at a testing center, you can choose to take a paper-based exam or a computer-based one, which most people do. For computer-based exams, testing dates are widely available at your convenience, except on national holidays and weekends.

For a paper-based exam, there are select testing dates for 2022-2023. The registration started on July 1, 2022. All the dates are listed below.

Keep in mind that paper-based exam is not available in all test centers.

All dates shown are (MM/DD/YYYY).

For Paper-Based Testing in the United States and Puerto Rico:

Test Date Regular Deadline Late Deadline *
09/17/2022 08/12/2022 08/19/2022
10/29/2022 09/23/2022 09/30/2022
04/08/2023 03/03/2023 03/10/2023

*Late registration is available for online registration only for a fee of US$25.

For Paper-Based Testing in All Other Locations, Including U.S. Territories:

Test Date Regular Deadline Late Deadline *
09/17/2022 08/05/2022 08/12/2022
10/29/2022 09/16/2022 09/23/2022
04/08/2023 02/24/2023 03/03/2023

*Late registration is available for online registration only for a fee of US$25.

To register for the GRE you need to create an ETS account, and you need to provide a method of payment and a passport or an ID. You can choose to request ETS disability services.

If you are interested in speaking with one of our GRE tutors, you can sign-up for a complimentary, 30-minute, consultation call. You can also learn more from our past clients who were able to achieve their cumulative 325+ score with us!

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more
GMAT or GRE
Posted on
28
Sep 2022

GMAT or GRE: What’s the difference?

If you are considering pursuing a graduate degree, you will likely need to take either the GMAT or GRE exam. While both exams are used for admission into graduate programs, there are some key differences between the two.

Both the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are standardized tests that have a lot in common in terms of their purpose.  But GMAT is required for admission to most business schools while GRE is accepted by most graduate schools.  But how do they differ?

GMAT or GRE: How are they different?

GMAT GRE
What are they? A standardized test required by most business schools. A standardized test required by most graduate schools, including many business schools.
Format The GMAT has four sections. A 31-minute Quantitative Reasoning section, a 65-minute Verbal Reasoning section, a 30-minute Integrated Reasoning section, and a 30-minute Analytical Writing section.  The GRE has four sections. Two 35-minute Quantitative Reasoning sections, Two 35-minute Verbal Reasoning sections,  a 60- minute Analytical Writing, and one unscored section that could be verbal or quantitative.
Testing time 3.5 hrs 3.75 hrs
Scoring GMAT is scored on a scale of 200-800 in increments of 10.  GRE is scored on a scale of 130-170 in increments of 1. 
Cost The GMAT costs $250 with a $35 fee for each score report sent after the first five free reports. The GRE costs $205 with a $50 fee for each score report sent after the first four free reports.
Validity 5 years 5 years

GMAT or GRE: Which exam to take?

That depends on your future plans after you complete your degree. Most people choose to take the GMAT because it’s tailored specifically for business school applicants. But if you’re interested in other graduate programs as well, or you want a more comprehensive test that covers more topics, then the GRE might be a better option for you.

Also, it’s always best to check with the schools that you intend to attend and see which test they prefer. 

GMAT or GRE: Bottom line

Both tests are designed to measure a person’s ability to think critically and solve problems. The GMAT is specifically geared towards students who want to pursue a career in business, while the GRE is more general and can be used for admission into a variety of graduate programs.

If you need help deciding which exam to take or preparing for either of them, reach out to our tutors at ApexGRE or ApexGMAT for private personalized tutoring sessions. We offer 30-minute complimentary consultations with one of the top-scoring instructors.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

Read more
GRE Study Plan Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Drafting It
Posted on
29
Apr 2022

GRE Study Plan – Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Drafting It

The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is a very popular exam that thousands of students take every year. A large percentage of these students find the GRE extremely challenging, so don’t worry if you feel the same way. However, if you are determined to succeed in your exam, you should have a well-developed study plan. An important aspect to consider when drafting your GRE study plan could be some of the most common mistakes that test-takers make in the creation of their study plan or schedule. In this article, we’ll give you more information on some of the most common mistakes in drafting GRE study plans and tips on how to avoid them.  

1. Dedicate enough time to preparation in your GRE study plan

The GRE is not an exam for which you can prepare within a matter of days. Although some students may be lucky enough to pass the exam with only 2-3 weeks of studying, do not rely on that. Most of them probably won’t get a satisfactory grade that will help them get into their dream school. To avoid such unpleasant situations, we suggest spending sufficient time and attention on your GRE prep. Different people take a different amount of time to prepare, so there is really no ultimate rule that applies to how early you should begin your preparation. However, it may be a good idea to start at least 3-4 months before your planned exam day in order to have enough time both for the exam preparation and the documentation part.  

The most important thing to remember is that preparing for the GRE should be a methodical process. You can’t cram it all in two weeks and expect to achieve a satisfactory result. Give yourself the time you need to succeed. Start your preparation on time and go with the pace that fits your abilities. Eventually, your persistent gradual work will pay off.

2. Prepare equally for every section of the GRE exam

While drafting their GRE study plan, many students make the mistake of devoting too much time to the section they find the hardest. When they start preparing, they get carried away with this particular section and underestimate the others. Unfortunately, this mistake often hurts their overall score. No single section should be avoided or paid less attention to. Each section is equally important for your overall score and you have to spend as much time on it as you feel you need. 

For example, the Quant is often considered the most difficult section by many students who tend to spend an enormous portion of their GRE prep time on it. However, you should not forget that you also get a large portion of your points from, for instance, the Verbal section. This means that you cannot overlook this section because you risk losing valuable points from your final result. Try to balance the different sections and spend enough time and effort on each of them, so that you can make sure you will achieve the highest result possible.

3. Take time to destress 

We have already mentioned the importance of hard and consistent work while preparing for your GRE exam. It’s now time to turn our attention to something very important, which many students wrongly neglect. Many students are very ambitious and they want to achieve a high GRE score. They are ready to work for hours and hours to perfect their knowledge and skills. However, they often end up overworking themselves and forgetting to put their minds to rest and recharge. This is a major mistake. It doesn’t matter how skillful or knowledgeable you are when you can’t put into practice what you know because you are overworked. Pushing yourself too far will not only negatively affect your score but also your mental health.

You should learn to take care of your emotional and physical health because they are crucial for gaining knowledge and building long-lasting skills required for acing the GRE. Make sure to not underestimate the power of good rest and separate enough time for it when drafting your GRE study plan. By doing this, you will be able to improve your memory and learning skills in the GRE prep process.

Conclusion

Knowing the most common mistakes that test takers make when preparing and undertaking their GRE study plan can help you avoid or deal with them effectively. Here at Apex, we know that preparing for the GRE exam day may be a challenging task. For this reason, we are more than happy to support you on your GRE journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you with every stage of your GRE journey!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

Read more
5 GRE Memorization Technique
Posted on
14
Apr 2022

5 GRE Memorization Techniques

Preparing for the GRE exam requires dedication, constant effort, and determination in order for one to achieve a satisfactory score. While there is theoretical knowledge that should be acquired and cannot be neglected, there are a few tips and tricks that you can learn relatively easily. The latter can save you some precious time so that you can focus on what is more difficult for you on the exam. Our tutors at Apex are 700+ scoring professionals who tailor their approach according to the mental and cognitive abilities of each client. Through this method of Cognitive Empathy, they help our clients learn tips on how to deal with the GRE exam and find simple solution pathways. Here are four of these GRE memorization techniques that our clients are taught.

1. Memorize the answer layout.

Some question types have the same responses. On the GRE, answers to the Data Completion Questions are presented in the same way. These being: 

  1. Quantity A is greater.
  2. Quantity B is greater.
  3. The two quantities are equal.
  4. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

As a test prepper, you can memorize these statements, given they remain the same throughout the entire GRE. We suggest memorizing a more simple form of these answer types. For example: 

  1. A is bigger
  2. B is bigger
  3. Both are equal
  4. Cannot know 

By using this as a memorization technique it will cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answer types each time you come in contact with them. 

2. Practice the vocabulary in everyday life.

Specialists argue that people can easily improve their English language skills if they broaden the size of their vocabulary by transferring words from their passive to active vocabulary. When a person knows what a certain word means but doesn’t ever use it in everyday life, this word is in their passive vocabulary. Once this word gets used when speaking or writing, it can be easily recalled from memory whenever it is needed. In this way, people can learn to use the word in a sentence while also considering the appropriate context and suitable collocations. This can be an immense benefit when preparing for the GRE, as the vocabulary section on the exam is quite challenging.

What many people do and what we would also suggest is using flashcards for memorizing the words and engraining them in your memory. Then commit to using a handful of them during the week. You can also keep a notebook with the most difficult terms, their dictionary definitions, and examples to revert back to them as your vocabulary grows.

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics.

If you are a couple of years out of school or if you are just having a hard time remembering mathematical concepts and formulas, the Quantitative portion on the GRE can seem like a daunting task. We understand this, which is why we avoid using math on the GRE all together! But sometimes, the best path is the most direct. Remember some basic math equations and formulas using the following tricks: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty! 
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction

4. Apply a visual meaning to things.

It is a common fact that people’s brains process visual stimulation much faster than textual information. That is why some people who have superior visual memory can recall visual information easily. Their brains have established relations between visual objects and data. This type of memory is very important when it comes to many academic tasks including doing reading comprehension exercises and mathematical operations. Naturally, it can be used on the GRE as well. So, if you are one of these people, or if you have never consciously used your visual memory to your advantage, this is your sign to try.

While studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. For example, when you are working on a particular math problem, stare at the radiator in your room. Then, during the exam (if you are taking the GRE online), look at the radiator once you come in contact with a similar problem. This trick will help your brain in remembering what you learned beforehand. If you are taking the GRE onsite, consider pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps fiddle with a ring on your finger while memorizing words, or wear a favorite sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices.

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often.

Reading information out of a textbook and taking notes is the approach most people have when learning. Although this may seem useful, people seem to forget most of the information they read about. For this reason, applying what you just read about in real life can be very useful. One way to do this is to practice doing questions in different locations – at a restaurant, while riding into work, while cooking dinner, etc. This will challenge your brain to think strategically in various situations and prepare it for the dynamic environment of the testing facility. You can do this both with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam. Plus it would look extra cool if you are seen jotting math equations down on a napkin while waiting for your food at a restaurant. 

These GRE memorization techniques may seem straightforward, but they require work. However, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, and thus the job you receive after graduating. While you are not your GRE, your test score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra help in preparing for the GRE, we offer extensive one-on-one tutoring with high-achieving clients. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

Read more
GRE Tips
Posted on
25
Feb 2022

Top 5 GRE Tips For The Exam Day

If you are interested in attending graduate school, you may have already started considering taking the GRE exam. This is a standardized exam that not only tests your knowledge and skills but also reveals your potential when applying to graduate schools. If you want to earn a high score, you have to consider different aspects during your preparation, including useful strategies to use on the day of the test. Below you can find our top 5 GRE tips to keep in mind during the exam!

1. Answer every question

There is no negative marking on the GRE. This means that you will face no penalty if you guess on some of the questions. If you aren’t sure about a particular question, it would be better to guess what the correct answer is rather than leave the question unanswered. Try to make a quick, but also educated guess. Even though it may not be the correct answer, by trying you can only gain points. In comparison, leaving a question unanswered will definitely bring you no points. Try your chance, it may be your lucky day, and you may even get it right!

2. Starting with the easy questions

All GRE questions in one section are worth the same points. Thus, you should start answering the questions that you are sure of and collect the “easier” points first. Whenever you come across a hard question, skip it for the moment and go back to it later. You can always use the marking function during the GRE exam to indicate which questions aren’t answered yet. When you are done with the rest of the questions in the section and have earned “all the easy points”, complete your marked questions. Then, review the questions you were unable to answer since you may be able to answer them when you return to them a second time.

3. Use the process of elimination

When you are not sure of the correct answer to a particular question, use the process of elimination. When you eliminate the incorrect answers you are closer to getting the correct answer. This increases your odds of picking the correct answer and getting some extra points from the question.

4. Read every question carefully

Reading your questions carefully and understanding what you are expected to do is crucial for success on the GRE exam. Many students often make careless reading mistakes which result in awkward answer choices. Some of them include misreading a word like “not” or “except” or formatting an answer to a math problem in the wrong way. All this can be avoided if you adopt the essential GRE tip of reading closely! 

5. Keep your pace

You have to keep an eye on the time and have a clear plan on how to organize it while taking the GRE test. The Verbal and Quant sections have 20 questions each. The Verbal section is 30 minutes long, which means you have about 1:30 minutes per question. The Quant section is 35 minutes, meaning you have about 1:45 min per question. You may want to practice sticking to these time limits so that you can ensure that you will have enough time for every question. Some questions may take you longer, but still, this is a good general guideline to follow in order to organize your time effectively.

 

To Review

Learning useful GRE tips and tricks for solving the exam can become a game-changer and help you skyrocket your score. Here at Apex, we know that preparing for the GRE exam day may be a challenging task. For this reason, we are more than happy to support you on your GRE journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace your GRE exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

Read more
Successful GRE Prep
Posted on
18
Feb 2022

Successful GRE Prep – The Dos and Don’ts

Studying for the GRE can be nerve-racking and pressuring. Preparing for something that important can be anxiety-ridden. But this feeling is normal. With proper help and planning, your GRE prep can be easier than you think. Before doing anything, getting introduced to the GRE can be very beneficial. Here we let you in on the major Dos and Don’ts of Successful GRE Prep.

1. Do take GRE practice tests

Practice tests give GRE takers a full overview of what to expect during the exam. This includes the types of questions you’ll encounter, time management, or even tricks hidden in certain questions. Taking practice tests while preparing for the GRE has a lot of benefits, but one of its main benefits is identifying certain techniques and gaining an eye to the GRE’s exam questions. After taking mock tests, you will familiarize yourself and your brain with the exam’s style. You will understand the pattern of particular question types and learn how to answer them. This can save you time during the actual GRE.

2. Don’t concentrate on certain sections on the GRE while prepping

Make sure you give every section its well-deserved time. Concentrating and giving your full energy and time on one section of the exam while studying can be meaningless and wasteful. While taking the practice exams, make sure the questions you are answering are diverse and different. That way, you are getting all that you need to ace your GRE. 

3. Do know your weaknesses and strengths

By reviewing your answers and results, your weak and strong points will be revealed. What is great about that is that you can know what you should be focusing on early on in your successful GRE prep. Daily practice of questions which challenge your weak areas, will help you reach the end of your GRE prep ready to tackle almost anything! That way too, you can construct a tailored GRE study plan. 

4. Don’t underestimate the vocabulary in the GRE

Vocabulary on the GRE verbal section is like the charger to your phone. And your phone without the charger is pretty much useless, right? And that is the case here too. The more vocabulary you know, the more points are guaranteed. However, memorizing the words and their definitions, simply extracted from the dictionary, is not enough. GRE takers should be able to know how to use and understand the words in certain contexts. It is about understanding and benefiting from the usage of the words learned, not just memorizing their meanings without being able to effectively use the words later on.

5. Do know what you are working for

Setting goals is scientifically proven to keep us, humans, on track. Having a solid target will remind you of why you are going through this process when things get tough! The power of goal setting is underestimated. When you have a vision, you will have the power and motivation to go through anything to get to it. All the long hours of studying can be sweetened with the help of a vision.

6. Don’t stress

The last and most important Don’t is, Do. Not. Over Stress. Regardless of the situation, stressing will do more harm than benefit. Stressing to the point of hair loss, sleepless nights, and restricting your personal life will make you underperform on the GRE. Successful GRE prep means you have a healthy work-study-life balance. Always remember, whatever you are stressing about, is probably not as bad as you think it is.

Closing Thoughts

Your GRE prep is the foundation of your performance for the actual GRE. Having a solid start is crucial. You need to know what you should focus on first, then divide your time and be able to manage all the tasks at hand. Your successful GRE prep can be simple and easy if you make it so. 

 

Contributor: Lilas Al-Sammak

Read more
How To Study For Your GRE Retake
Posted on
05
Nov 2021

How To Study For Your GRE Retake

You’ve studied countless hours, canceled plans with numerous friends, and even changed your diet and caffeine consumption to fuel your brain as best as possible. And yet, after all that, your final combined score result is just a 320. Not bad, but also not perfect. This score can get you into most graduate school programs, but can it get you into that elite ‘top’ school you are aiming for? If you have the resume and top-notch essay responses to back up your GRE score, then you may feel comfortable applying to your dream graduate school with that score.

But what if you are still unsure? Is it worth spending the hundreds of dollars, and continuing the stringent study plan you had just spent months trudging through to try again? Perhaps a second attempt means you will bump up your score to a 324, or maybe your second attempt will land you with a score of equal or – gulp – lesser value! After going through the cost-benefit analysis of such an undertaking, you may have decided on the undertaking of retaking the GRE.

But how do you study for the GRE the second time to guarantee a higher score?

You are not alone in asking this question, and, unfortunately, there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ answer or study plan that can guarantee a higher score and make the retake worthwhile financially and timewise. However, there are some things you can begin doing now which can help you embark on your GRE retake journey.

1. Book the GRE retake sooner rather than later

Deciding on ‘when’ to retake the GRE can have a huge effect on your ability to succeed in the test. We suggest booking the retake sooner rather than later. This will help set a definite timeline of how long you must study and how you can expect to structure the coming weeks. Additionally, don’t wait months to retake the GRE. Once you have decided that you will retake the exam, be sure to schedule it a couple of weeks after the last test you took. While it may seem to be a time crunch, this is because you are not starting from scratch when studying for your retake. You already have a whole host of wealth stuck in your head! It will hang around for a few weeks, requiring only brief reviews and refreshers to keep the knowledge up to date.

2. Focus on your weaknesses

So, you have taken your first GRE test. You now know how you test under time pressure, and you can adjust your studying accordingly. Did you find that you struggled with the time constraints? We suggest focusing on different studying methods which will help you feel more comfortable under the time constraints. During the test you may realize that you did not study enough for certain quantitative-type questions, or your GRE vocabulary was lacking. In this case, spend time before your retake focusing on the areas you found most challenging. By no means does this mean ‘ignoring’ your strengths, rather, spend the most time on your weakness, being sure to set aside a few hours a week to review and rehash the parts of the exam you feel most comfortable with.

3. Consult with your network

Whether you recognize it or not, the people around you are important to your mental health and wellbeing. Because studying for the GRE is a mentally draining venture, relying on your network can help you get through the most difficult aspects of studying for the GRE. As you already experienced over the last few months of studying, an effective student may opt for moments of quiet study rather than social events with friends and family. This doesn’t change your second time around taking the test.

However, your friends and family may be disappointed to hear that you are extending your absences from events further to study for your second round. It is important, then, to confer with them. Let them know what you are doing and why. Perhaps someone in your network had a similar experience and they can offer you advice and tips on how to rock your second round. Additionally, do not be shy to let them know how you are feeling and how they can best support you during your studying. This can help alleviate any further stress you may accumulate during the time you sequester away over the books.

4. Get a private tutor

It may seem obvious but hiring a private tutor who specializes in the GRE can help push you to the next level. Often, your struggles with the GRE can be alleviated by the unique perspectives and solution paths a private tutor can give you. Our GRE tutors at ApexGRE specialize in working with students who want to achieve an elite score and are looking to develop the skills to do just that. We invite all interested potential clients to sign-up HERE for a complimentary consultation call where we can discuss your GRE and graduate school goals. Our tutors are happy to work with an array of clients. Whether it is their first or fifth time taking the GRE and whether they have 6 months to prepare or just a few weeks, we can work within your time frame and skill level to help you achieve your goals.

Finally, deciding to retake the GRE means countless more hours of hard work. Deciding whether it is worth it is up to you, however, being prepared for the process of retaking the GRE can help alleviate the stress of the decision.


Contributor: Dana Coggio

Read more