The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips
Posted on
25
Mar 2022

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section Guide & Tips

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section can be a tough nut to crack. But never fear! We’ve compiled some top tips to help you ace this section of the test. So whether you’re a math whiz or just looking to brush up on your quantitative skills, read on for everything you need to know to score high on the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section.

What does the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section test? 

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to use basic math concepts and solve problems under time pressure. While the quantitative reasoning section does assess some high-level math, it focuses primarily on real-world problem-solving skills.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Question Categories 

The math you learned in high school is mostly what’s on the GRE. The majority of GRE math questions won’t require tons of number-crunching if you know how to approach them, but they will test your critical thinking and problem solving abilities. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions will generally fall into one of four major categories: 

1. Arithmetic

The arithmetic category covers basic math concepts such as integers, fractions, and decimals. It also includes the concepts of ratio, absolute value, and sequences of numbers. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in the arithmetic category may also ask you to calculate percentages or solve word problems.  

2. Algebra

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions that fall into this category may test your ability to solve equations or inequalities. Questions in this area often require you to know the properties of basic algebraic functions (for example, solving linear and quadratic equations, equations and inequalities, factoring) as well as their graphs. 

3. Geometry

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may test your knowledge of angles, triangles 30°-60°-90°, three-dimensional figures, or coordinate geometry. Questions in geometry often ask you to calculate the area of a shape or determine the distance between two points on a plane. 

4. Data analysis

In this part, you will be asked to interpret data from graphs such as bar and circle charts, box plots, scatter plots. This includes finding the mean, median, mode, range, standard deviations, interquartile range, quartiles, and might include probability questions as well. 

An example might be two six-sided dice, each side has a number between 1 and 6. What is the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown?

There are 36 possible outcomes when two dice are thrown. Out of those, six outcomes will result in a sum of 7. This means that the probability of getting a sum of 7 when two dice are thrown is 6/36 or 1/6.

Format

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section is composed of two 35-minute sections. In both sections you can expect:

  • Quantitative Comparison questions

    These questions always include a column of numbers and a column labeled “A” or “B”. Your task is to compare the two columns. GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may also ask you to identify which number is larger, which number lies between two other numbers, or which of two expressions is an integer.

  • Problem Solving questions

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category will test your ability to solve problems. You will be asked to determine the solution set of an equation or graph, interpret data, or solve a problem based on real-world scenarios.

  • Data Interpretation

    GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category may ask you to interpret data presented in a table, graph, or text passage. You may also be asked to determine the relationship between variables or predict future outcomes based on trends.

The GRE Quantitative Reasoning – 4 Types of Questions

1. Quantitative Comparison questions

You will be given 4-option-multiple-choice questions. You will need to use your skills to determine the relationship between quantities.

Example:

Quantity A
The least prime number greater than 24

Quantity B
The greatest prime number less than 28

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given. 

Answer: For the integers greater than 24, note that 25, 26, 27, and 28 are not prime numbers, but 29 is a prime number, as are 31 and many other greater integers. Thus, 29 is the least prime number greater than 24, and Quantity A is 29. For the integers less than 28, note that 27, 26, 25, and 24 are not prime numbers, but 23 is a prime number, as are 19 and several other lesser integers. Thus, 23 is the greatest prime number less than 28, and Quantity B is a prime number less than 28. The correct answer is Choice A, Quantity A is greater.

2. Multiple-choice questions (One Answer Choice)

These are questions that have five possible answers. You need to choose the correct answer from among these choices.

Example: A certain jar contains 60 jelly beans — 22 white, 18 green, 11 yellow, 5 red, and 4 purple. If a jelly bean is to be chosen at random, what is the probability that the jelly bean will be neither red nor purple?

A. 0.09
B. 0.15
C. 0.54
D. 0.85
E. 0.91

Answer: There are 5 red and 4 purple jelly beans in the jar. That means there are 51 jelly beans that are neither red nor purple. The probability of selecting one of these is 51/60, or 0.85. The correct answer is D

3. Multi-select questions (One or More Answer Choices)

In this category you are allowed to select more than one answer choice. GRE quantitative reasoning questions in this category usually begin with a series of answer choices and present data in a table, graph, or text passage.

Example: Which of the following integers are multiples of both 2 and 3?Indicate all such integers.

A. 8
B. 9
C. 12
D. 18
E. 21
F. 36

Answer: There are a few different ways to figure out the answer. You can find the multiples of 2, which are 8, 12, 18, and 36. Then you can look for the multiples of 3, which are 12, 18, and 36. Another way to do it is if you know that every number that is a multiple of 2 and 3 is also a multiple of 6. So then you would just pick the choices that are multiples of 6. The answer is C (12), D (18), and F (36).

4. Numeric Entry Questions

GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions in this category allow you to type your own answers into empty boxes. This means that you won’t be given answers to choose from. 

Example: One pen costs $0.25 and one marker costs $0.35. At those prices, what is the total cost of 18 pens and 100 markers?

Answer: $0.25 multiplied by 18 equals $4.50. This is the cost of the 18 pens.

$0.35 multiplied by 100 equals $35.00, which is the cost of the 100 markers. The total cost is therefore 4.50 + 35.00 = $39.50. Equivalent decimals, such as $39.5 or $39.500  (or any equivalent), are considered correct answers.

Remember to only use the decimal point and negative sign when entering the numbers in the answer box. No need to add the dollar sign since it’s already added in the answer box.

Tips to Ace The GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section

1. Plug in numbers

It can be very helpful to plug in numbers when you’re in doubt of the correct answer. ETS GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills but rather how well you can solve problems.

2. Memorize the answer choices 

In Quantitative Comparison questions the answers are always in the following order:

A. Quantity A is greater.
B. Quantity B is greater.
C. The two quantities are equal.
D. The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

You should be able to answer questions within 2 minutes and, therefore, this will save you time.

3. Make sure the answer is in the correct format

In the Numeric Entry questions, you will have to fill in an empty box. Therefore, you need to make sure that you are writing your answer in the correct format. Keep an eye on questions that might ask you to round the answer. 

4. Pay extra attention to words

Make sure to spot words such as “between”, “except”, “not”, “approximately”, “about”. Make sure that you don’t round down or up. You don’t want to lose points because you misread the question when you actually knew the correct answer. 

5. Process of elimination

The strategy of eliminating wrong answers can be your best friend. If you’re having trouble with GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions, you can always use the process of elimination to help you narrow your choices.

6. Do practice questions

Practicing will help you to become familiar with the examination pattern. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning section contains many similar questions with slight variations on the same concept. Practicing will help you be more relaxed and confident on the day of the exam. The GRE Quantitative Reasoning tests your understanding and not just your ability to remember formulas or mathematical concepts. 

Keep in mind that on the exam day, you can use a basic calculator. So make sure you are using a simple calculator while practicing because you won’t have extra features on the exam.

GRE Private tutoring

If you are not comfortable with GRE Quantitative Reasoning, if you find it difficult, or if you are not confident with your math skills, you can always sign up for private GRE tutoring. Apex private GRE tutors focus on your needs and personal strengths, tailoring personalized GRE lessons to best help you achieve your goals.

Remember, the GRE Quantitative Reasoning is not testing your math skills, but rather how well you can solve problems. The best way to do well on this exam is to familiarize yourself with the types of questions by practicing. We hope these insights have been helpful so far, but if not, feel free to reach out anytime with more specific inquiries.

 

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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GRE Quantitative Section
Posted on
11
Mar 2022

GRE Quantitative Section – Everything You Need To Know!

If you are planning to apply to graduate schools, business schools, or even law schools, then you probably know by now that your GRE score is an essential part of your application. More likely than not, you have already begun studying for the GRE. In today’s article, the main focus will be on the GRE’s Quantitative (or Math) Section and what this section is all about.

The quantitative section in the GRE tends to measure your ability to solve problems and reason quantitatively. Besides that, it tests your basic mathematical skills and your capabilities to comprehend elementary mathematical concepts. All this can sound a little pressuring and frightening at first but when you get familiar with the section, you will feel much more confident. Remember, everything you need for the GRE quant section you already learned in high school. 

The GRE Quantitative Section: The Layout

To start, the quantitative section consists of Data Interpretation, Quantitative Comparison, and Problem Solving questions. You are given 35 minutes to finish each of these sections. With 20 questions in each section, you will have between 1.5 to 2 minutes to solve each question.

The distribution of these sections is as follows:

     1. Quantitative Comparison Questions
     2. Problem – Solving Questions
     3. Data Interpretation Questions


The GRE Quantitative Section: Quantitative Comparison Questions

When it comes to the quantitative comparison questions, you are given 2 quantities – A and B and are asked to pick out the connection between them. Connections like Quantity A is greater than Quantity B, Quantity B is smaller than Quantity A, or the two Quantities are equal.

You will most probably see around 8 of these questions in your quantitative sections.

The Quantitative Comparison section is there to measure your ability to link concepts and to find relationships between mathematical matters in general. Alongside that, it tests your skills to reason quantitatively.

 Example: 

                                                     y>4

             Quantity A                                               Quantity B

             (3y+2) / 5                                                        y

(A) Quantity A is greater
(B) Quantity B is greater
(C) The two quantities are equal
(D) The relationship cannot be determined from the information given

Answer: B


The GRE Quantitative Section: Problem Solving Questions

Often Problem Solving Questions are asked in the form of multiple-choice questions. You are given 5 answers to choose from but only one of them is correct. The format of these questions can also vary – you should expect to be asked to enter answers in a blank box (Type Your Numeric Answer Questions).

You will face around 6 to 7 Problem-Solving Questions during your GRE exam.

These types of questions test your problem-solving skills as well as your knowledge of basic math. Your strategic mathematical calculations are also evaluated.

Example: 

At Store T, the dollar amount of sales for 2007 was what percent of the dollar amount of sales for 2008?

Give your answer to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Answer: 108.7% (or equivalent) 


The GRE Quantitative Section: Data Interpretation Questions

These types of questions are correlated to graphs and/or charts. Answers to these types of questions should be derived from these given graphs and charts. Analyzing and understanding them would be the most important factor to guarantee you points on the Data Interpretation Questions.

Your skills in comprehending elementary mathematical concepts are tested here.

Example: 

Store

Percent Change from 2006 to 2007 Percent Change from 2007 to 2008

P

10

-10

Q

-20

9

R

5

12

S

-7

-15

T 17

-8

Annual Percent Change in Dollar Amount of Sales at Five Retail Stores from 2006 to 2008.

If the dollar amount of sales at Store P was $800,000 for 2006, what was the dollar amount of sales at that store for 2008?

(A) $727,200
(B) $792,000
(C) $800,000

(D) $880,000
(E) $968,000

Answer: B


Apex Tips to Ace Your GRE Quantitative (or Math) Section

1. Avoid doing the math
As ironic as that sounds, if you are doing complex, long calculations, you are likely to be doing something wrong. To ace the Math Section during your GRE, try to find methods that can help you solve the problem without drilling on calculations. This way, you will see things differently without using your calculator and wasting time.

2. Guess if you are unsure
You are gaining points upon every correct answer. Do not waste your time trying to find the answer to something you are unsure of. Plan to find the answer to a question within a minute and a half. If it is taking more than that, then guess the answer by elimination and move on to the next question.

3. Do not let your math anxiety get the best of you
If you feel like you are getting anxious during your prep journey or even during your exam, take a minute to breathe and gather yourself. Math is much easier if you don’t let it get the best of you.

With our help and your dedication and hard work, you have nothing to worry about. Book your free consultation session with one of our top-scoring GRE tutors here

You are one step closer to acing your GRE Math Section!


Contributor
: Lilas Al-Sammak

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Beginning GRE Prep
Posted on
04
Feb 2022

Beginning GRE Prep: The Go-Getter’s Guide To GRE Prep

If you are looking for ways to excel in your career by embarking on a journey to graduate school, you are going to face the challenge of having to take the Graduate Record Examination, more commonly known as the GRE. Luckily, with the right preparation and guidance, every motivated candidate can obtain a score that satisfies their personal desires (and school requirements) and accomplish their academic goals. Throughout this article, we are going to provide you with the ultimate GRE go-getter’s guide.

1. Get acquainted with the GRE exam

The GRE is an essential part of one’s application to most graduate schools in the United States and Canada. It is a part of your application requirements together with your portfolio that includes your essays, letters of recommendation, interview, and resume. In addition, GRE exams are available for candidates in fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, literature, and psychology, depending on the preferences of students. For this reason, a strong performance on the GRE can be used to satisfy graduate school requirements, complement your portfolio, and make you stand out from the crowd.

This is a standardized exam that aims to measure the verbal, quantitative, and analytical skills of undergraduates regardless of their fields of study. Rather than being a question-by-question computer-adaptive exam, the GRE determines the difficulty of each section based on the candidate’s performance in the previous section. In short, it is a section-adaptive exam.

When it comes to scoring, GRE scores are valid for five years. Having this knowledge can help you manage your time properly when applying for graduate schools and may even trigger you to take the exam before you have started fulfilling other requirements of your application. 

Sections

The general GRE test is about 3 hours and 45 minutes long. It consists of three main sections – Analytical Writing, Quantitative Reasoning, and Verbal Reasoning. The 60-minute Analytical Writing section is broken into an Argumentative Writing Task and an Issue Writing Task. The duration of each of the two Quantitative Reasoning tasks is 35 minutes, whereas the duration of each of the two Verbal Reasoning sections is 30 minutes. On the computer-adaptive version of the exam, there is also a 30-minute experimental section.

The test includes a 1-minute break after each section and a 10-minute break after the third section.

Unlike the GMAT, the format of the GRE allows the examined person to freely move back and forth between the questions of each section, leave unanswered questions for later, and mark them for review. 

2. Choose a way to prepare

We live in a digital age and have an infinite amount of resources at our disposal. If we want to take up a hobby, acquire a new skill, or prepare for an exam, we can do it all online by ourselves. 

When it comes to the GRE, the situation is similar. Having so many resources at your disposal can seem overwhelming when beginning GRE prep. Here at Apex we know how useful it will be to you to have access to a GRE go-getter’s guide that can break each step of your preparation down to smaller tasks. 

Firstly, you can choose to prepare by self-studying. This decision can be made for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, it is cost-efficient. A candidate will have access to online resources such as practice tests and articles. However, one should be aware that these are very limited. Another reason why you might choose to self-prep is that you will be able to work at your own pace.

There is also the possibility of hiring a specialized GRE tutor. Although costly, GRE Private tutoring is an option that is reasonable because your GRE needs will be met by a person who knows how the exam works and how you can prepare for it without wasting your time. If you’re interested, we have written a more detailed guide on what type of preparation is best for you.

3. Plan your GRE preparation

Every GRE journey begins with determining one’s goals. This includes choosing a program to apply to, doing research on the minimum score the respective school requires of candidates, and finally, beginning GRE preparation.

Here comes the time when it would be best for you to take a free GRE practice test. Make sure to take one without any preparation. By doing this baseline assessment, you will get to know where you currently stand, what your strengths and weaknesses are, and how far you will need to go to achieve your goals. You will also use this result to track your progress. 

Then it is time to begin studying. Take your time to work on each section separately. First, you need to analyze the results from the practice test you took, see where you made mistakes, and make note of inefficient solution pathways. Only then you can focus on the Quant section and on the Verbal section. Don’t forget to review what you’ve learned once again. Then, we suggest working on the Analytical Writing Section towards the end of your prep.  

Final Thoughts

All in all, in this go-getter’s guide, we looked at the main steps one should consider when beginning GRE prep. The latter includes learning more about the nature of the exam, choosing a model of preparation that will suit your needs, and coming up with a GRE study plan. If you are interested in individualized private tutoring, we offer complimentary 30-minute consultation calls with one of our top-scoring instructors!

 

Contributor: Reneta Georgieva

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GRE percentiles
Posted on
31
Dec 2021

GRE Percentiles – Understanding Your GRE Score

ETS, the official makers of the GRE, compile and publish statistics on the GRE. We have reviewed the statistics and organized them for you to peruse below. If you are in the middle of studying for your GRE exam and are looking for expert help, our professional tutors at Apex GRE are available anywhere in the world. You can set up a 30-minute, complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors if you are considering a private GRE tutor. 

The following data has been collected by ETS between July 1st, 2017, and June 30th, 2020. 

Performance Statistics on the GRE

When applying to graduate school, the GRE is often an inevitability. Most top-tier business schools require students to take the exam. While many programs claim that they do not have a GRE minimum for admissions, it is important to aim for a score that lands you in a top percentile. Achieving a top score may not guarantee admission, however, it will offer you a better shot at getting into the school of your dreams. 

GRE Quant & Verbal Reasoning Percentiles 

Below is a chart of recent GRE percentiles (Collected between 2017-2020). When looking at potential graduate programs, take a look at previous admissions statistics.

GRE Quant Reasoning Percentiles

Knowing the average GRE score of previously admitted students can give you a baseline to aim for. Striving for the average, means you have a better likelihood of getting a score above or around this. Giving you a higher chance at admissions. 

Interpreting the GRE percentiles requires knowing how the GRE is scored. The total score comprises the Verbal and Quantitative sections plus a third analytical writing portion. These scores show the admissions committee your higher-order reasoning skills. These scores are able to predict a student’s success in graduate school.

The scores range from 130-170, with the analytical writing portion being scored from 0-6. When comparing your score to other test-takers, it is important to look at percentile rankings. When reading a percentile ranking chart, find your score on the chart.

GRE Verbal Reasoning Percentiles

Let us assume you scored 156 on the verbal portion. This lands you in the 72nd percentile. Meaning your score is higher than 72% of test-takers. Those scoring a 170, for example, are in the 99th percentile. This means that they achieved a score higher than 99% of all test takers. Important to remember is that percentile rankings change each year. This is because as more and more students take the exam, the total scores achieved change, and your percentile ranking changes with it. 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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GRE Quantitative
Posted on
15
Oct 2021

Everything about the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE

By: ApexGMAT
Contributor: Simona Mkhitaryan
Date: October 15, 2021

As mentioned in the previous Article, GRE consists of 3 main sections: Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning, and Quantitative Reasoning. There is also one unscored section which can be either quantitative or verbal. This article concentrates on the Quantitative Reasoning section of GRE. 

How long is the Quantitative Reasoning section? 

The Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE has 20 questions with a total of 35 minutes, 1.5 to 2 minutes to answer each question. It is helpful to know that the number of question types included in the exam is different. The Quantitative Comparison questions come first, then Problem Solving questions and Data Interpretation questions, presented as a set at the end of the section. 

What does Quantitative Reasoning measure, and why is it important?

The quantitative reasoning section of GRE measures the ability to solve different types of mathematical problems, interpret and analyze quantitative data, demonstrate basic knowledge of algebra, geometry, data analysis, and arithmetic. The test does not cover trigonometry, calculus, or higher-level math; it will be enough to have the level of Algebra 2. 

  • Arithmetic: This section includes problems connected with divisibility, factorization, working with prime numbers, remainders, odd/even integers. It also touches upon topics such as arithmetic operations, exponents, roots, and other topics such as estimation, percent, ratio, rate, absolute value, number line, decimal representation, as well as sequences of numbers. An example can be ‘What are the factors of 13’, or ‘Which of the following is closest to the square root of 10.5’?
  • Algebra: This part mostly concentrates on equations and functions such as factoring and simplifying functions, and working with inequalities. It also includes coordinate geometry that is working with graphs of functions, intercepts, and slopes of lines. Examples include find the distance between the points (-4 , -6) and (-1 , -2) or solve the equation |- 2 x + 2| – 3 = -3 or find the x-intercept of the equation 2x – 4y = 9.
  • Geometry: This area covers topics related to 2-dimensional figures and three-dimensional figures: parallel and perpendicular lines, circles, triangles, quadrilaterals, other polygons, congruent and similar figures, area, perimeter, volume, and concepts such as the Pythagorean theorem and angle measurement in degrees. For instance, find the hypotenuse of the triangle using the Pythagorean theorem, or triangles ABC and A’B’C’ are similar figures; find the length AB if you know the ratio between the triangles.
  • Data analysis: This part is mainly focused on interpreting data from graphs such as bar and circle graphs; box plots, and scatter plots; finding the mean, median, mode, range, standard deviation, interquartile range, quartiles, and percentiles, analyzing frequency distributions, probability types of questions as well as counting methods such as combinations, permutations, and Venn diagrams. Examples include when a number x is added to the data set 4, 8, 20, 25, 32, the new mean is 15. Find the value of x. Another one is on a six-sided die; each side has a number between 1 and 6. What is the probability of throwing a three or a 4?
What types of questions does the GRE Quantitative Reasoning Section include? 

There are four types of questions in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section:

  • Quantitative Comparison Questions – These types of questions are similar to the “Data Sufficiency” questions on the GMAT. 2 values will be given and four options to choose from such as 1) quantity X is bigger, 2) quantity Y is bigger, 3) the quantities are equal, 4) there’s not enough information to know which is bigger.
  • Multiple-choice Questions with one correct answer – usually Problem solving questions or data interpretation.
  • Multiple-choice Questions with more than one answer. – usually, Problem-solving questions, which are much like quantitative questions on the SAT or data interpretation.
  • Numeric Entry Questions – Problem-solving or data interpretation. 

The questions can appear independently or as a group of questions usually associated with a “Data interpretation” set. The data is generally displayed in graphs, tables, charts, or other informational displays. Some of the questions on the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE are purely mathematical. However, there are also real-life problems and word problems that must be interpreted and solved mathematically. 

Is a calculator allowed on the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE?

Unlike the GMAT, using a specific GRE calculator during the Quantitative Reasoning section is permitted. For paper-delivered GRE, the GRE calculator will be provided during the test, but the examinees cannot bring their own to the exam. For computer-based GRE, one can use the on-screen calculator. However, simple calculations are often quicker and safer to solve without a calculator to avoid entry errors. As mentioned, not all calculators are allowed during the exam. 

So, what can the GRE calculator be used for?  

  • Add, subtract, divide, multiply 
  • Parenthesize
  • Take the square root of
  • Add a decimal to 
  • Change signs
  • Store the answers via memory keys
  • Display up to eight digits at a time

The calculator doesn’t include exponents, constants like π or e, logarithmic (ln, log) or trigonometric (sine, cosine, tangent) functions, nested parentheses, or the ability to square or cube. 

What is the maximum score for the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE? 

Each QR and VR are scored on a range of 130-170 points, making the highest possible score on the GRE a 340. Additionally, it is essential to know that the GRE is a section-adaptive test. Within each section, all questions are in the same level of complexity and are contributed equally to the final score. Unlike GMAT, GRE is adaptive at the level of the section. This means that the questions will not change within each section, yet the second complete set of 20 questions in the next section will.

How to prepare for the Quantitative Reasoning Section of the GRE

First of all, it is vital to learn the structure of the questions: In order to get familiar with the types of questions, the easiest way is to take various practice tests to become familiar with the format and then concentrate on actually solving the problems and getting the highest score possible. Find out practice problems can be found in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Problems. 

Thus, it is also essential to set a target score: Taking a practice test is an excellent starting point. This determines the level of your initial score. It also helps to identify how much time one has to allocate to the preparation to improve their score and achieve their goal target. 

Make a study plan and stick with the schedule: It is vital to design a personalized study plan to guide throughout the preparation, decide what sources and courses one needs, whether they are going to prepare only with tests, or go step by step through topics and types of quant questions moreover considering to take courses with a GRE private tutor, with whom one will get a lot of help and guidance in their GRE preparation creed. For more information about the Quant GRE tutoring and preparation, visit https://apexgre.com/inquire-now/.

Also, sticking to the study schedule is critical since one has to continue studying consistently in order to see progress, especially when the talk is about mathematics. 

Conclusion:

In conclusion, as mentioned above, the quant section of GRE has four types of questions that measure the ability to understand and solve the basic problems of mathematics, which also include data interpretation. A calculator will be provided during the QR section. Additionally, the QR section of the GRE required comprehensive studies and preparation; that is why it is useful to schedule and start preparing for the exam a few months earlier.

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